Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Determinism, philosophy: the idea that events and mental states occur due to strict laws and are therefore determined in advance. For a prediction one only has to know the environmental conditions. The fact that we do not know if determinism is true is sometimes explained by our incomplete knowledge of the environment. See also indeterminism, strict laws, prediction, probability, probabilism.
 
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I 540
Determinism/Knowledge/Indeterminateness/Feynman: even if the world were consistently classically determined (QM did not apply), we could not predict the behavior of the individual particles: the smallest initial error quickly becomes a great uncertainty. If any precision is given, no matter how accurate, then you can specify a time that is long enough that our predictions are not valid for such a long time.
For example, with an accuracy of 1 to a billion, it is not about millions of years, time only depends on the error logarithmically. We will lose all information after a very short time.
It is therefore not fair to say that we should have realized from the freedom of the human mind that "quantum mechanics" would have meant the redemption from a mechanistic universe.

Uncertainty Principle/Indeterminacy/Feynman: in practical terms it already existed in classical physics.

Fey
R. Feynman
Vom Wesen physikalischer Gesetze München 1993

Fey I
R. Feynman
Vorlesungen über Physik I München 2001


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-29