Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Signs: signs are recognizable and definable forms that an observer can assign to two domains. The first domain is the repertoire of available forms that allows a distinction of similarity and dissimilarity within this domain, the second domain is a set of objects which also distinguishes between similarity and dissimilarity between these objects as well as distinguishing the objects of the second domain from the forms of the first domain. There are no signs without observation or interpretation. See also language, words, symbols, icons, systems, image, image theory, pictures, assignment.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
Author Item    More concepts for author
Armstrong, D.M. Signs   Armstrong, D.M.
Austin, J.L. Signs   Austin, J.L.
Baudrillard, Jean Signs   Baudrillard, Jean
Black, Max Signs   Black, Max
Carnap, Rudolf Signs   Carnap, Rudolf
Cresswell, M.J. Signs   Cresswell, M.J.
Duhem, Pierre Signs   Duhem, Pierre
Foucault, M. Signs   Foucault, M.
Frege, Gottlob Signs   Frege, Gottlob
Geach, Peter T. Signs   Geach, Peter T.
Goodman, Nelson Signs   Goodman, Nelson
Grice, H.P. Signs   Grice, H.P.
Heidegger, M. Signs   Heidegger, M.
Lacan, J. Signs   Lacan, J.
Locke, John Signs   Locke, John
Logic Texts Signs   Logic Texts
Luhmann, Niklas Signs   Luhmann, Niklas
Mill, John Stuart Signs   Mill, John Stuart
Millikan, Ruth Signs   Millikan, Ruth
Morris, Ch.W. Signs   Morris, Ch.W.
Peirce, Ch.S. Signs   Peirce, Ch.S.
Quine, Willard Van Orman Signs   Quine, Willard Van Orman
Rorty, Richard Signs   Rorty, Richard
Tugendhat, E. Signs   Tugendhat, E.
Wittgenstein, L. Signs   Wittgenstein, L.


Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-07-29