Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Tautology, philosophy: A tautology is a statement that is constructed in such a way that it cannot be wrong, because its elements are repeated either affirmatively or negatively, or an exhaustive enumeration of possibilities is spread between which no decision is made. For example, A = A; If A, then A; A or non-A. Tautologies are not informative. See also certainty, information, knowledge, logic, validity, universality, contradiction, truth values, interpretation.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
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V 190/91
Tautology: SearleVsWittgenstein: tautologies are not empty: e.g. "either he is fascist or he is not a fascist" is very different from "either he is hairdresser or he is not a hairdresser".


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

S I
J. R. Searle
Die Wiederentdeckung des Geistes Frankfurt 1996

S II
J.R. Searle
Intentionalität Frankfurt 1991

S III
J. R. Searle
Die Konstruktion der gesellschaftlichen Wirklichkeit Hamburg 1997

S IV
J.R. Searle
Ausdruck und Bedeutung Frankfurt 1982

S V
J. R. Searle
Sprechakte Frankfurt 1983


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-06-26