Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Falsification: experimental or logical refutation of a general or a specific statement. Depending on the nature of the statement, there are differences in terms of whether a single counterexample is sufficient for a falsification, or a certain ratio of positive and negative cases is crucial. See also verification, verificationism, confirmation, Bayesianism, probability, hypotheses, theories.
 
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EMD II 119
Assertion/Correctness/Dummett: no assertion can be both correct and incorrect, because it cannot be verified and falsified at the same time - but we come dangerously close if the falsification condition does not determine the meaning of the sentence when it is used independently.
EMD II 120
"Is not incorrect": = unfalsifiable.
EMD II 122
Not every assertion must be correct or incorrect - it could turn out later.
Realism: perhaps it never turns out.
Dummett: if we understand this assertion, it is because of truth conditions.

Du I
M. Dummett
Urspr√ľnge der analytischen Philosophie Frankfurt 1992

Du III
M. Dummett
Wahrheit Stuttgart 1982

EMD II
G. Evans/J. McDowell
Truth and Meaning Oxford 1977

Ev I
G. Evans
The Varieties of Reference (Clarendon Paperbacks) Oxford 1989


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-24