Dictionary of Arguments


Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 
[german]

Screenshot Tabelle Begriffes

 

Find counter arguments by entering NameVs… or …VsName.

Enhanced Search:
Search term 1: Author or Term Search term 2: Author or Term


together with


The author or concept searched is found in the following 2 entries.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Extraversion Ackerman Corr I 168
Extraversion/intelligence/Ackerman: The associations between Extraversion and intellectual abilities, and Conscientiousness and intellectual abilities appear to be of a negligible magnitude. Small positive correlations between these traits and abilities are found as often as small negative correlations. However, it is important to keep in mind a central issue with respect to these two personality traits that differs from either the intelligence-related personality constructs or even Neuroticism. That is, what one considers to be ‘normal’ or optimal is not found at one end of the continuum of the traits, but rather somewhere near the middle. >Neuroticism/intelligence/Ackerman. Theorists who have asserted that individuals who are neither too high nor too low on such traits are optimally adjusted (see e.g., Robinson 1989(1); though cf., Matthews 1985(2) for a differing view (personality traits/MatthewsVsRobinson), have hypothesized that linear correlations are not appropriate measures to assess the relationship between the personality traits and intellectual abilities.


1. Robinson, D. L. 1989. The neurophysiological bases of high IQ, International Journal of Neuroscience 46: 209–34
2. Matthews, G. 1985. The effects of extraversion and arousal on intelligence test performance, British Journal of Psychology 76: 479–93


Phillip L. Ackerman, “Personality and intelligence”, in: Corr, Ph. J. & Matthews, G. (eds.) 2009. The Cambridge Handbook of Personality Psychology. New York: Cambridge University Press


Corr I
Philip J. Corr
Gerald Matthews
The Cambridge Handbook of Personality Psychology New York 2009
Neuroticism Ackerman Corr I 168
Neuroticism/intelligence/Ackerman: A broad factor of Neuroticism (which usually is considered to include broad Anxiety, Stress Reaction, Negative Affect or Negative Emotionality) shows consistent negative correlations with an array of both general and specific intellectual abilities (e.g., on the order of r = −.15 with general intelligence). Correlations between Neuroticism related traits and mathematical abilities are typically larger in magnitude than are correlations between Neuroticism and verbal abilities, though the differences are not large. Theorists who have asserted that individuals who are neither too high nor too low on such traits are optimally adjusted (see e.g., Robinson 1989(1); though cf., Matthews 1985(2) for a differing view (personality traits/MatthewsVsRobinson), have hypothesized that linear correlations are not appropriate measures to assess the relationship between the personality traits and intellectual abilities.


1. Robinson, D. L. 1989. The neurophysiological bases of high IQ, International Journal of Neuroscience 46: 209–34
2. Matthews, G. 1985. The effects of extraversion and arousal on intelligence test performance, British Journal of Psychology 76: 479–93


Phillip L. Ackerman, “Personality and intelligence”, in: Corr, Ph. J. & Matthews, G. (eds.) 2009. The Cambridge Handbook of Personality Psychology. New York: Cambridge University Press


Corr I
Philip J. Corr
Gerald Matthews
The Cambridge Handbook of Personality Psychology New York 2009