Dictionary of Arguments


Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 
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Reference
Hermeneutics Chladenius Gadamer I 186
Hermeneutics/Chladenius/Gadamer: (...) as already a glance at the title of his writing(1) teaches, Chladenius is basically put in a false light if one sees in his hermeneutics a preform of historical methodology. Not only is the case of the "interpretation of historical books" not the most important point for him - in any case, it is the factual content of the writings that is at stake, and the whole problem of interpretation is basically a pedagogical and occasional one. The interpretation is explicitly concerned with "vernünftige Reden und Schriften". To him, interpretation means "to teach those concepts which are necessary for the perfect understanding of a passage. Interpretation, then, is not intended to "indicate the true understanding of a passage", but is expressly intended to remove any obscurities in texts that prevent the student from having the "perfect understanding" (preface). The interpretation must be based on the insight of the student (§ 102)(1). >Interpretation/Chladenius.

1. J.M.Chladenius, Einleitung zur richtigen Auslegung vernünftiger Reden und Schriften, 1742.


Gadamer I
Hans-Georg Gadamer
Wahrheit und Methode. Grundzüge einer philosophischen Hermeneutik 7. durchgesehene Auflage Tübingen 1960/2010

Gadamer II
H. G. Gadamer
The Relevance of the Beautiful, London 1986
German Edition:
Die Aktualität des Schönen: Kunst als Spiel, Symbol und Fest Stuttgart 1977
Language Medieval Philosophy Gadamer I 438
Language/Word/Object/Medieval/Gadamer: (...) the theological relevance of the problem of language in medieval thought [points] back again and again to the problem of the unity of thought and speech and [brings] (...) thereby (...) a moment to the fore (...) that had not been thought in this way in classical Greek philosophy. The fact that the word is a process in which the unity of what is meant is expressed to perfection - as is thought in verbum speculation (>Word of God/Gadamer) - means something new compared to the Platonic dialectic of the one and many. (>Unity and Multiplicity) Because for Plato, the Logos itself moves within this dialectic and is nothing but suffering the dialectic of ideas. There is no real problem of interpretation here in so far as the means of interpretation, the word and the speech, are constantly overtaken by the thinking spirit.
Trinity/Gadamer: In contrast to this, we found in the Trinitarian speculation that the process of the divine persons includes the Neoplatonic question of unfolding, i.e. the process of coming forth from the one, and therefore also does justice to the process character of the word for the first time. (>Trinity/Gadamer).
Scholasticism: But the problem of language could only come to a full breakthrough when the scholastic mediation of Christian thought was combined with Aristotelian philosophy through a new moment, which turned the distinction between divine and human spirit into a positive one and was to gain the greatest significance for the modern age. It is the common ground of the creative. (>Creation Myth/Gadamer.) In it, it seems to me that the position of Nicholas of Cues, which has been so much discussed recently,(1) has its real distinction. >Word of God/Nicholas of Cusa, >Language/Renaissance.


1. Cf. K. Volkmann-Schluck, who seeks to determine the historical location of St. Nicholas from the idea of the "image": Nicolaus Cusanus, 1957; especially pp. 146ff. (as well as J. Koch, Die ars coniecturalis des Nicolaus Cusanus (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Forschung des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen, issue 16) and my own works "Nicolaus von Cues und die Philosophie der Gegenwart" (Kl. Schr. Ill, p. 80-88; Vol. 4 of the Ges. Werke) and "Nicolaus von Cues in der Geschichte des Erkenntnisproblems" (Cusanus-Gesellschaft 11 (1975), p. 275-280; Vol. 4 of the Ges. Werke).


Gadamer I
Hans-Georg Gadamer
Wahrheit und Methode. Grundzüge einer philosophischen Hermeneutik 7. durchgesehene Auflage Tübingen 1960/2010

Gadamer II
H. G. Gadamer
The Relevance of the Beautiful, London 1986
German Edition:
Die Aktualität des Schönen: Kunst als Spiel, Symbol und Fest Stuttgart 1977
Situations Katz Eco II 118
Situation/Semantics/Katz/Fodor/Eco: according to Katz and Fodor, the semantic components to be interpreted must not depend on the situation or circumstance (called settings) in which the sentence is pronounced. They point out different possible readings, but the theory does not want to specify... ---
II 119
...how and why the sentence has to be used in one sense or another. Unambiguity/Katz/Fodor: the theory can explain whether a sentence has different meaning, but not under which circumstances it must lose its ambiguity.
EcoVsKatz/EcoVsFodor:
1. if you stop at the distinguishers, you do not measure all connotation possibilities of the lexeme. 2. Both the semantic markers and the distinguishers are sings or sign groups that are used to interpret the initial sign. (>Problem of interpretation).
3. the family tree of Katz/Fodor recognises the intentions usually determined by a dictionary. The code therefore coincides with the dictionary. The existence of special conventions and codes, such as those suggesting other branches, will not be...
---
II 120
...taken into account, nor the fact that different forms of branching can coexist in the same community.

Katz I
Jerrold J. Katz
"The philosophical relevance of linguistic theory" aus The Linguistic Turn, Richard Rorty Chicago 1967
In
Linguistik und Philosophie, G. Grewendorf/G. Meggle Frankfurt/M. 1974

Katz II
Jerrold J. Katz
Jerry Fodor
Sprachphilosophie und Sprachwissenschaft
In
Linguistik und Philosophie, G. Grewendorf/G. Meggle Frankfurt/M. 1974/1995

Katz III
Jerrold J. Katz
Jerry Fodor
The availability of what we say in: Philosophical review, LXXII, 1963, pp.55-71
In
Linguistik und Philosophie, G. Grewendorf/G. Meggle Frankfurt/M. 1974/1995

Katz V
J. J. Katz
The Metaphysics of Meaning


Eco I
U. Eco
Opera aperta, Milano 1962, 1967
German Edition:
Das offene Kunstwerk Frankfurt/M. 1977

Eco II
U, Eco
La struttura assente, Milano 1968
German Edition:
Einführung in die Semiotik München 1972
Situations Eco Eco II 118
Situation/Semantics/Katz/Fodor/Eco: according to Katz and Fodor, the semantic components must not depend on the situation or circumstance to be interpreted (called settings) in which the sentence is pronounced. They point out different possible readings, but the theory does not want to specify... --
II 119
...how and why the phrase has to be used in one sense or another. Clarity/Katz/Fodor: the theory can explain whether a sentence has different meanings, but not under which circumstances it must lose its ambiguity.
EcoVsKatz/EcoVsFodor:
1. If you stop at the distinguishers, you do not consider all connotation possibilities of the lexeme. 2. Both the semantic markers and the distinguishers are signs or sign groups that are used to interpret the initial signs. (>Problem of interpretation: Situations/Eco, Situations/Katz).
3. The lineage of Katz/Fodor recognises the intentions usually determined by a dictionary. The code therefore coincides with the dictionary. The existence of special conventions and codes, such as those suggesting other branches, will not be...
---
II 120
...considered, neither the fact that different forms of branching can coexist in the same community.

Eco I
U. Eco
Opera aperta, Milano 1962, 1967
German Edition:
Das offene Kunstwerk Frankfurt/M. 1977

Eco II
U, Eco
La struttura assente, Milano 1968
German Edition:
Einführung in die Semiotik München 1972

Unambiguity Katz Eco II 118
Situation/Semantics/Katz/Fodor/Eco: according to Katz and Fodor, the semantic components to be interpreted must not depend on the situation or circumstance (called settings) in which the sentence is pronounced. They point out different possible interpretations, but the theory does not want to define,... ---
II 119
....how and why the phrase must be used in one sense or another. Unambiguity/Katz/Fodor: the theory can explain whether a sentence has different meanings, but not under which circumstances it must lose its ambiguity.
EcoVsKatz/EcoVsFodor:
1. If you stop at the distinguishers, you do not measure all connotation possibilities of the lexem. 2. Both the semantic markers and the distinguishers are characters or character groups that are used
to interpret the initial character. (>Problem of interpretation).
3. The lineage of Katz/Fodor recognises the intentions usually determined by a dictionary. The code therefore coincides with the dictionary. The existence of special conventions and codes, such as those suggesting other branchings, will not...
---
II 120
...be taken into account, nor the fact that different forms of branching can coexist in the same community.

Katz I
Jerrold J. Katz
"The philosophical relevance of linguistic theory" aus The Linguistic Turn, Richard Rorty Chicago 1967
In
Linguistik und Philosophie, G. Grewendorf/G. Meggle Frankfurt/M. 1974

Katz II
Jerrold J. Katz
Jerry Fodor
Sprachphilosophie und Sprachwissenschaft
In
Linguistik und Philosophie, G. Grewendorf/G. Meggle Frankfurt/M. 1974/1995

Katz III
Jerrold J. Katz
Jerry Fodor
The availability of what we say in: Philosophical review, LXXII, 1963, pp.55-71
In
Linguistik und Philosophie, G. Grewendorf/G. Meggle Frankfurt/M. 1974/1995

Katz V
J. J. Katz
The Metaphysics of Meaning


Eco I
U. Eco
Opera aperta, Milano 1962, 1967
German Edition:
Das offene Kunstwerk Frankfurt/M. 1977

Eco II
U, Eco
La struttura assente, Milano 1968
German Edition:
Einführung in die Semiotik München 1972
Unambiguity Eco Eco II 118
Situation/Semantics/Katz/Fodor/Eco: according to Katz and Fodor, the semantic components to be interpreted must not depend on the situation or circumstance (called settings) in which the sentence is pronounced. They point out different possible readings, but the theory does not want to specify... ---
II 119
...how and why the phrase has to be used in one sense or another. Clarity/Katz/Fodor: the theory can explain whether a sentence has different meaning, but not under which circumstances it must lose its ambiguity.
EcoVsKatz/EcoVsFodor:
1. If you stop at the distinguishers, you do not consider all connotation possibilities of the lexeme. 2. Both the semantic markers and the distinguishers are signs or sign groups that are used to interpret the initial signs. (>Problem of interpretation).
3. The lineage of Katz/Fodor recognises the intentions usually determined by a dictionary. The code therefore coincides with the dictionary. The existence of special conventions and codes, such as those suggesting other branches, will not be...
---
II 120
...considered, neither the fact that different forms of branching can coexist in the same community.

Eco I
U. Eco
Opera aperta, Milano 1962, 1967
German Edition:
Das offene Kunstwerk Frankfurt/M. 1977

Eco II
U, Eco
La struttura assente, Milano 1968
German Edition:
Einführung in die Semiotik München 1972