Dictionary of Arguments


Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 
[german]

Screenshot Tabelle Begriffes

 

Find counter arguments by entering NameVs… or …VsName.

Enhanced Search:
Search term 1: Author or Term Search term 2: Author or Term


together with


The author or concept searched is found in the following 9 entries.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Behavior Morozov Morozov I 214
Behavior/Social Networks/Technology/Digitalization/Politics/Economy/Kelly/Morozov: Kelly's thesis: Only by listening to the history of technology (...) we can hope to solve our personal puzzles. (1) Kelly: we can modify our legal and economic expectations by adapting them to the (...) technological development lines. (2)
I 215
MorozovVsKelly: Why should we change our economic and political assumptions if we could change those lines of development instead? Why change our notions of privacy if we could change Facebook and Google instead? Why should we accept predictive policing measures instead of restricting them to areas where they do not undermine contradiction and reason? And to what extent should we change our expectations?
KellyVsMorozov: instead, he thinks you should try every idea immediately. And continue as long as this idea exists. (3)
I 216
Behavior/KellyVsAmish/Kelly/Morozov: Kelly accuses the Amish of denying opportunities not only to their own people, but to all people. (4) MorozovVsKelly: It never dawned on Kelly that political communities may be entitled to determine their own lives, and that restrictions as far as they have been democratically created - as is not always the case with the Amish - could also be good for humanity. Kelly's all about the means.

1. Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants, Kindle ed. (New York: Penguin Books, 2011), p. 6
2. ibid. p. 174
3. ibid., p.252. 4. ibid. p. 237.

Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014

Behavior Kelly Morozov I 214
Behavior/Social Networks/Technology/Politics/Economy/Kelly/Morozov: Kelly thesis: Only by listening to the history of technology (...) can we hope to solve our personal puzzles. (1) Kelly: we can modify our legal and economic expectations by adapting them to the (...) technological development lines. (2)
I 215
MorozovVsKelly: Why should we change our economic and political assumptions if we could change those lines of development instead? Why change our notions of privacy if we could change Facebook and Google instead? Why should we accept predictive policing measure instead of restricting them to areas where they do not undermine contradiction and reason? And to what extent should we change our expectations? KellyVsMorozov: instead, he thinks you should try every idea immediately. And continue as long as this idea exists. (3)
I 216
Behavior/KellyVsAmish/Kelly/Morozov: Kelly accuses the Amish of denying opportunities not only to their own people, but to all people. (4) MorozovVsKelly: It never dawned on Kelly that political communities may be entitled to determine their own lives, and that restrictions as far as they have been democratically created - as is not always the case with the Amish - could also be good for humanity. Kelly's all about the means.


1. Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants, Kindle ed. (New York: Penguin Books, 2011), p. 6
2. ibid. p. 174
3. ibid., p.252. 4. ibid. p. 237

Kelly I
Kevin Kelly
What Technology Wants New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Map Example Kelly Kelly I 2439
Map/Kelly: an example of how a map becomes territory is that when development curves have been recorded (e. g. Moore's Law, Kryder's Law) they become known to others. Scientists, marketers and journalists then follow these pathways and use them to conduct experiments, make investments, etc. At the same time, however, the curves continue to develop independently. ((s)> MorozovVsKelly.)

Kelly I
Kevin Kelly
What Technology Wants New York 2011

Markets Kelly Morozov I 217
Markets/Technology/Kelly/Morozov: Kelly thesis: the limitation of technology is ineffective, if not harmful. Restrictions are also not permanent. If something is confined in one place, it comes back to life elsewhere. (1) Globalization/Marketplace/Kelly: Thesis: Where a technology is banned locally, it slips out of control to be bundled elsewhere on the globe. (2)
MorozovVsKelly: but why should we take a global view of technology when it is regulated by local conditions? Maybe a local community was strong enough to block something unacceptable.
Politics/MorozovVsKelly: the misleading thing about his speech is that it is technological, but in reality it is highly political.


1. Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants, Kindle ed. (New York: Penguin Books, 2011), p. 242
2. ibid. p. 243

Kelly I
Kevin Kelly
What Technology Wants New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Moore's Law Kelly Kelly I 1293
Moore's Law/Kelly: 500 years ago, Moore's law did not apply (that the performance of technologies doubles in 18 months while the price is halved): for example, a hammer did not become easier to handle over the decades, for example, the strength of iron did not improve.
Morozov I 218
Moore's Law/Kelly/Morozov: Kelly Thesis: The curve behind Moore's Law is a way in which the Technium (the technology) speaks to us. (1) Meanwhile/Kelly/Morozov: The idea that Moore's law resembles a natural law is widespread in Silicon Valley - it is one of Ray Kurzweil's original myths - and has long spread beyond the technology industry, often called upon to justify an action.
IlkkaTuomi/Morozov: Ilkka Tuomi conducted an extensive empirical study on industry growth rates and echoes in the media - Tuomi thesis: Actually, there is no such law. Most of the discussions about Moore's Law are historically inaccurate and go far beyond the available data. (2)
Tuomi: sociologically fascinating is how myths are created in modern society and how quickly they find their way into scientific literature, industrialist speeches and governmental announcements all over the world. (3) (See MorozovVsKelly)


1. K. Kelly, What Technology Wants, p. 170.
2. Law: Ilkka Tuomi, “The Lives and Death of Moore’s Law,” First Monday 7, no. 11 (2002), http:// firstmonday.org/ htbin/ cgiwrap/ bin/ ojs/ index.php/ fm/ article/ view/ 1000/ 921.
3. ibid.

Kelly I
Kevin Kelly
What Technology Wants New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Moore's Law Kurzweil Morozov I 218
Moore's Law/Kurzweil/Morozov: The idea that Moore's law resembles a law of nature is widespread in Silicon Valley - it is one of the original myths of Ray Kurzweil's singularity movement - and has long spread beyond the technology industry, often called upon to justify action. Ilkka Tuomi/Morozov: Ilkka Tuomi conducted an extensive empirical study on industry growth rates and media echoes - TuomiVsKurzweil: Thesis: In fact, there is no such law. Most of the discussions about Moore's Law are historically inaccurate and go far beyond the available data. (1)
Tuomi: sociologically fascinating is how myths are created in modern society and how quickly they find their way into scientific literature, industrialist speeches and governmental announcements all over the world. (2) (See Moore's Law/Kelly; >MorozovVsKelly)

1. Law”: Ilkka Tuomi, “The Lives and Death of Moore’s Law,” First Monday 7, no. 11 (2002), http:// firstmonday.org/ htbin/ cgiwrap/ bin/ ojs/ index.php/ fm/ article/ view/ 1000/ 921.
2. ibid.

Kurzw I
Ray Kurzweil
The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology New York 2006


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Nature Kelly Morozov I 217
Nature/Technology/Kelly/Morozov: "The dominance of technology ultimately derives from its origin in the same self-organization that has brought galaxies, planets, life and mind into being. (1) Kelly: "We tend to isolate the produced technology from nature, to the point that we consider it as anti-nature only because it has grown to compete with the effects and power of its homeland. But in its origins and foundations, a tool is as natural as our lives." (2)
MorozovVsKelly: compare this with Nazi propagandist Fritz Todt:
Fritz Todt: It would be paradoxical if the works of technology in their outer expression were in contradiction with nature, because the true essence of technology is a consequence of the laws of nature. .... The works of technology must be constructed in harmony with nature... (3)....
MorozovVsKelly: his laissez-faire attitude comes equally from Ayn Rand, even though he does not mention it. It is rarely mentioned at all in connection with technology. (See Technology).


1. Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants, Kindle ed. (New York: Penguin Books, 2011), p. 70.
2. ibid. p. 22
3. quoted in John C. Guse, “Nazi Technical Thought Revisited,” History and Technology: An International Journal 26, no. 1 (2010): 10.

Kelly I
Kevin Kelly
What Technology Wants New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Technology Morozov I 213
Technology/Morozov: is considered by many authors to be neutral in terms of good or evil and as something inevitable (1), (2), (3). Morozov: the view that technology is something autonomous, has a long line of ancestors, best represented by Langdon Winner, 1978 (4).
I 214
Technology/Kelly/Morozov: Kevin Kelly, the first publisher of Wired has written an influential book "What Technology wants". (5) (See also Technology/Kelly). Kelly/Morozov: Kelly Thesis: Kelly, who uses a fancy word, "Technium", as a replacement for "Technology " with a capital T, assures his readers that "the Technium wants what we want, that it wants what we impose upon it to do. In addition, the Technium has its own wishes! It wants to prove itself as something special and give itself a hierarchical structure. It also wants to preserve itself and gain complexity and power, like all living systems.
MorozovVsKelly: his speech is full of duplicity. At the same time, he assures us that we have control and that there is actually no need for such control, because it is too late. (6)
Technology/Evolution/Kelly: Both allegedly wanted the same thing, because technology is only evolution by other means. He notes that "with small differences, the evolution of Technium- the organism of ideas - mimics the evolution of genetic organisms". (7)


1. Gordon Crovitz, “Is Technology Good or Bad? Yes,” Wall Street Journal, August 23, 2010, http:// online.wsj.com/ article/ SB10001424052748703579804575441461191438330. html.
2. Nick Bilton, I Live in the Future and Here’s How It Works: Why Your World, Work, and Brain Are Being Creatively Disrupted (New York: Random House Digital, 2010), 216.
3. Parag Khanna and Ayesha Khanna, Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (New York: TED Conferences, 2012).
4. Langdon Winner, Autonomous Technology: Technics-out-of-Control as a Theme in Political Thought (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1978).
5. Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants, Kindle ed. (New York: Penguin Books, 2011).
6. ibid. p.187
7. ibid. p. 44

Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014

Wikipedia Kelly Morozov I 30
Wikipedia/Kevin Kelly/Morozov: "The bureaucracy of Wikipedia is relatively small to be invisible" (1), the technology expert Kevin Kelly announces and confesses that "much of what I believed in human nature and the nature of knowledge was inverted by Wikipedia". Kelly writes that "everything I knew about the structure of information convinced me that knowledge wouldn't come spontaneously from data without a lot of energy and intelligence that is consciously designed to transform it" (2). MorozovVsKelly: But there is no reason not to believe that nowadays. As it turns out, Wikipedia has a huge - not small - bureaucracy; its rules cover the most arcane ((s) obscure) topics.

1. Kevin Kelly, “The Collaborative Community,” in What Have You Changed Your Mind About?: Today’s Leading Minds Rethink Everything, ed. John Brockman (New York: HarperCollins, 2009), 177.
2. ibid. 176

Kelly I
Kevin Kelly
What Technology Wants New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014