Dictionary of Arguments


Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 
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Reference
Google Jarvis Morozov I 28
Google/Jarvis/Morozov: the definition of Internet values is notoriously difficult. Take someone like the Internet expert Jeff Jarvis, who argues in his first book "What Would Google Do?" (1) that other institutions should copy Google's business philosophy, both for profit and for non-profit purposes. His argumentation is: "The Internet" seems open, public and collaborative. Google seems to be like that as well, and it is thriving. Therefore, its values are openness, publicity and cooperation; these are also Internet values that bring profits and efficiency. MorozovVsJarvis: This logic is so circular that there is no way for experts like him to be wrong. (See Google/Morozov)

1. Jeff Jarvis, What Would Google Do?, 1st ed. (New York: Harper Collins, 2009).

Jarvis I
Jeff Jarvis
What Would Google Do?: Reverse-Engineering the Fastest Growing Company in the History of the World New York 2011

Jarvis II
Jeff Jarvis
Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Internet Jarvis Morozov I 56
Internet/Printing/Jarvis/MorozovVsJarvis/Morozov: for Jarvis' (...) world view tools are something fixed. They are outside of culture and history. This also characterizes Jarvis's writing about "the Internet" itself, (...) which is understood as unproblematic and unchangeable, its democratic nature (would be) carved in stone. MorozovVsJarvis/MorozovVsShirky: their two views on "the Internet" are far too broad and abstracted from local conditions, if they even overlap with the history of book printing.

Jarvis I
Jeff Jarvis
What Would Google Do?: Reverse-Engineering the Fastest Growing Company in the History of the World New York 2011

Jarvis II
Jeff Jarvis
Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Politics Jarvis Morozov I 135
Politics/Internet/Jarvis/Morozov: Jarvis is enthusiastic about a policy led by geeks in the name of scientific rationality. ---
I 136
MorozovVsJarvis: he is not at all aware of how completely unoriginal such plans are. These demands are not so different from those of Saint-Simon, who demanded in 1821 that decisions in a new political order should be the result of scientific demonstration, regardless of human will (1). Bernard CrickVsSaint-Simon: Saint-Simon hated arbitrariness, incompetence and intrigue. These are characteristics of a policy, even of a very good one, as it is used in free states to regulate conflicts of interest. (2)

1. Zitiert in B. Crick, In Defence of Politics, (1961) p 73.
2. ibid. P. 74

Jarvis I
Jeff Jarvis
What Would Google Do?: Reverse-Engineering the Fastest Growing Company in the History of the World New York 2011

Jarvis II
Jeff Jarvis
Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014
Politics Sunstein I 42
Politics/Sunstein: should politics be made according to survey results? The theorem of Condorcet makes the question seem less pointless than it appears at first glance. (See Decision Theory/Condorcet). However, this only applies to yes/no questions within groups whose members are most likely to be correct in their majority. This may be the case in consultative bodies in companies, or in certain specialist areas when a panel of experts is consulted. However, it would not work if the population of a country, such as the United States, were asked whether the Kyoto Protocol should be signed.
---
I 44
In many areas, people are subject to systematic mistakes. However, the question remains whether group discussions help. (See Democracy/Sunstein). Functioning democracies delegate certain issues to expert committees. ((s) See MorozovVsJarvis and MorozovVsShirky. ---
I 45
In an experiment in Colorado in the summer of 2005, liberal and conservative groups were mixed together to discuss some issues such as whether the United States should sign a climate change agreement or whether affirmative action should be accorded to disadvantaged groups. (1) The result was clear: in almost every group, the positions were more extremely polarized after the discussions, with the respective starting positions of the groups being more strongly represented.
---
I 46
In addition, the respective groups found greater homogeneity. ---
I 49
Group discussion/John Rawls: Thesis: The advantages lie in the combination of information and increasing the range of arguments. (2) SunsteinVsRawls: see above.

1. See Reid Hastie, David Schkade, and Cass R. Sunstein, “What Really Happened on Deliberation Day?” (University of Chicago Law School, unpublished manuscript, 2006).
2. 8. John Rawls, A Theory of Justice (Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 1971), 358–59.

Sunstein I
Cass R. Sunstein
Infotopia: How Many Minds Produce Knowledge Oxford 2008

Sunstein II
Cass R. Sunstein
#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media Princeton 2017

Reputation Jarvis Morozov I 241
Reputation/Jarvis/Morozov: Jarvis' thesis: "The way you can influence your reputation is often to share more, not less. The best solution is to be yourself. If that bothers you, talk to your psychiatrist. Even better, blog about it." (1) MorozovVsJarvis: but what if your insurance company starts reading your blogs? Will you be able to cope with the restrictions ((s) due to risk upgrades?) Jarvis does not talk about that.


1. Jeff Jarvis, Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2011), p. 131.

Jarvis I
Jeff Jarvis
What Would Google Do?: Reverse-Engineering the Fastest Growing Company in the History of the World New York 2011

Jarvis II
Jeff Jarvis
Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live New York 2011


Morozov I
Evgeny Morozov
To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism New York 2014