Lexicon of Arguments


Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 
[german]


 

Find counter arguments by entering NameVs… or …VsName.

The author or concept searched is found in the following 7 entries.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Causation Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Lewis V 195
Individuation/Redundant causation/Peter van Inwagen: thesis: an event that happens as a product of multiple causes could not have happened without being the product of these causes. The causes could not have caused any other event. Analogy to the individuation of objects and human beings by their causal origins.
LewisVsInwagen:
1. This would ruin my analysis of analyzing causation in concepts of contrafactual dependency. (s) Any deviation would be a different event, not comparable, no contrafactual conditionals applicable). 2. It is prima facie implausible: I can legitimately make alternative hypotheses about how an event (or an object or a human being) has been caused.
But by that I am assuming that it was the same event! Or that one and the same event might have had different effects.
(Even Inwagen himself assumes that).
Plan/LewisVsInwagen: implies even more impossible: either my whole plans or hypotheses are hidden impossibilities, or they are not at all about a particular event.

Redundant causation/Lewis: important argument: if these are two "different deaths", then there is no redundancy!

Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Determinism Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Pauen V 273
Determinism/Peter van Inwagen/Pauen: determinism is not an implication of physicalism. The principle of causal closure refers to the fact that only physical explanations may be used. This does not mean that the cause/effect ratio must always be deterministic.
The principle of physical determination does not make a statement about the necessity of certain causal chains but only requires that there is a physically describable change for every change that can be described in a higher level.
van Inwagen: determinism thus stands for the thesis that the state of the world can be derived anytime later from a complete description and knowledge of the state of affair.
Pauen: it is more than controversial that the determinism applies to our physical reality.
- - -
Lewis V 296
Determinism/VsSoft determinism/VsCompatibilism/van InwagenVsLewis: (against the soft determinism which I pretend to represent): E.g. supposed to reductio that I could have lifted my hand, though determinism would be true.
Then follows from four premises which I can not deny that I could have produced a false conjunction HL from a proposition H over a time before my birth and a certain proposition about a law L.
Premise 5: if so, then I could have falsified L.
Premise 6: but I could not have falsified L. (Contradiction).
LewisVsInwagen: 5 and 6 are not both true. Which is true depends on what Inwagen means by "could have falsified". But not in the ordinary language but in Inwagen's artificial language. But even there it does not matter what Inwagen himself means!
What is important is whether we can give a sense to this at all, which makes all premisses valid without circularity.
Inwagen: (verbally) third meaning for "could have falsified": namely, and only if the acting person could have arranged things the way that his acting plus the whole truth about the prehistory together imply the nontruth of the proposition.
Then, premise 6 says that I could not have arranged things the way that I was predestined not to arrange them like that.
Lewis: but it is not at all instructive to see that soft determinism has to reject the in that way interpreted premise 6.
V 297
Falsification/Action/Free Will/Lewis: provisional definition: an event falsifies a proposition only if it is necessary that in the case that the event happens, then the proposition is false. But my act of throwing a rock would not itself falsify the proposition that the window in the course remains intact. All that is true is that my act invokes another event that would falsify the proposition.
The act itself does not falsify any law. It would falsify only a conjunction of prehistory and law.
All that is true is that my act precedes another act - the miracle - and this falsifies the law.
Weak: let us state that I would be able to falsify a proposition in the weak sense if and only if I do something, the proposition would be falsified (but not necessarily by my act and not necessarily by any event evoked by my act). (Lewis pro "weak thesis" (soft determinism)).
Strong: if the proposition is falsified either by my act itself or by an event which has been evoked by my act.
Inwagen/Lewis: the first part of his thesis stands, no matter whether we represent the strong or weak thesis:
If I could lift my hand although determinism is true and I have not lifted it then it is true in the weak and strong sense that I could have falsified the conjunction HL (propositions on the prehistory and the natural laws).
But I could have falsified the proposition L in the weak sense although I could not have falsified it in the strong sense.
Lewis: if we represent the weak sense, I deny premise 6.
If we represent the strong sense, I deny premise 5.
Inwagen: represents both premises by considering analogous cases.
LewisVsInwagen: I believe that the cases are not analogous: they are cases in which the strong case and the weak case do not diverge at all:
Premise 6/Inwagen: he asks us to reject the idea that a physicist could accelerate a particle faster than the light.
LewisVsInwagen: but that does not help to support premise 6 in the weak sense,
V 298
Because the rejected presumption is that the physicist could falsify a natural law in the strong sense. Premise 5/Inwagen: here we are to reject the assumption that a traveler might falsify a conjunction of propositions about the prehistory and one about his future journey differently than by falsifying the nonhistorical part.
LewisVsInwagen: please reject the assumption completely which does nothing to support premise 5 in the strong sense. What would follow if one could falsify conjunction in the strong sense? That one could falsify the nonhistorical part in the strong sense? This is what premise 5 would support in the strong sense.
Or would only follow (what I think) that the nonhistorical part could be rejected in the weak sense? The example of the traveler does not help here because a proposition about future journeys could be falsified in the weak as well as the strong sense!

Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Pau I
M. Pauen
Grundprobleme der Philosophie des Geistes Frankfurt 2001

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991
Endurantism Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 34
Endurantism/Van Inwagen/Schwarz: e.g. caterpillar/butterfly: thesis: there is no insect, nothing that exists beyond the pupation.
Recombination/Mereology/Schwarz: the existence of temporal parts follows directly from the mereological universalism together with the rejection of the presentism. Then there are also example aggregates from Socrates and Eiffel Tower (mereological sum) Socrates is a temporal part of it, which at some point ceases to exist. Just as e.g. a dried-out lake that fills up again at the rainy season.

Temporal parts/van Inwagen: (van Inwagen 1981) van Inwagen basically rejects temporal parts.
SchwarzVsInwagen: then he has to radically limit the mereological universalism or be a presenter.

Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Metaphysics Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 27
Metaphysics/Being/Essential/van InwagenVsLewis/StalnakerVsLewis: knowing about contingent facts about the current situation would in principle not be sufficient to know all a posteriori necessities: Def strong necessity/Chalmers: thesis: in addition to substantial contingent truths, there are also substantial modal truths: e.g. that Kripke is essentially a human being, e.g. that pain is essentially identical to XY.
Important Argument: knowledge of contingent facts is not sufficient to recognize these modal facts. How do we recognize them, perhaps we cannot do this (van Inwagen 1998) or only hypothetically through methodological considerations (Block/Stalnaker 1999).

A posteriori Necessity/Metaphysics/Lewis/Schwarz: normal cases are not cases of strong necessity. You can learn e.g. that Blair is premier or e.g. evening star = morning star.
LewisVsInwagen/LewisVsStalnaker: other cases (which cannot be empirically found) do not exist.
LewisVsStrong Necessity: has no place in his modal logic. >LewisVsTelescope Theory: worlds are not like distant planets of which one can learn which ones exist.

Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Modalities Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 227
Modality/LewisVsInwagen: there are no substantial modal facts: what possibilities there are is not contingent. You cannot get any information about this.

Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Objects (Material Things) Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 28ff
Object/Thing/van Inwagen: (1990b) thesis: parts only become an object when it is a living creature. After that, there are people fish, cats but no computers, walls and bikinis. Object/Thing/Lewis: better answer: two questions:
1. Under what conditions do parts form a whole? Under all! For any thing there is always a thing that they put together. (Def mereological universalism/ > Quine).
2. Which of these aggregates do we count in our everyday world as an independent thing? That we do not consider some aggregates as everyday things does not mean that these aggregates do not exist. (However, they exceed the normal domains of our normal quantifiers). But these limitations vary from culture to culture. It is not reality that is culture-dependent, but the part of reality that has been noticed. (1986e, 211 213, 1991:79 81).
LewisVsInwagen/Schwarz: if only living creatures could form real objects, evolution could not begin.
LewisVsInwagen: no criterion for "living creatures" is so precise that it could draw a sharp cut.
Schwarz I 30
Lewis: for him this is no problem: the conventions of the German language do not determine with atomic accuracy to which aggregates "living creatures" applies. (1986e, 212) LewisVsInwagen: for him, this explanation is not available: for him, the border between living creatures and non-living creatures is the border between existence and non-existence. If it is vague what a living creature is, then existence is also vague.
Existence/van Inwagen: (1990b. Chap.19) thesis: some things are borderline cases of existence.
LewisVsInwagen: (1991,80f,1983e,212f): if one already said "there is", then the game is already lost: if one says, "something exists to a lower degree".
Def existence/Lewis: simply means to be one of the things that exist.

Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Totality Inwagen
 
Books on Amazon
Schwarz I 28ff
Object/Thing/van Inwagen: (1990b) thesis: parts only become an object when it is a living creature. After that, there are people, fish, cats but no computers, walls and bikinis. Object/Thing/Lewis: better answer: two questions:
1. Under what conditions do parts form a whole? Under all! For any thing there is always a thing that they put together. (Def mereological universalism/ > Quine).
2. Which of these aggregates do we count in our everyday world as an independent thing? That we do not consider some aggregates as everyday things does not mean that these aggregates do not exist. (However, they exceed the normal domains of our normal quantifiers). But these limitations vary from culture to culture. It is not reality that is culture-dependent, but the part of reality that has been noticed. (1986e, 211 213, 1991:79 81).
LewisVsInwagen/Schwarz: if only living creatures could form real objects, evolution could not begin.
LewisVsInwagen: no criterion for "living creatures" is so precise that it could draw a sharp cut.
Schwarz I 30
Lewis: for him this is no problem: the conventions of the German language do not determine with atomic accuracy to which aggregates "living creatures" applies. (1986e, 212) LewisVsInwagen: for him, this explanation is not available: for him, the border between living creatures and non-living creatures is the border between existence and non-existence. If it is vague what a living creature is, then existence is also vague.
Existence/van Inwagen: (1990b. Chap.19) thesis: some things are borderline cases of existence.
LewisVsInwagen: (1991,80f,1983e,212f): if one already said "there is", then the game is already lost: if one says, "something exists to a lower degree".
Def existence/Lewis: simply means to be one of the things that exist.

Inwa I
Peter van Inwagen
Metaphysics Fourth Edition


Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005

The author or concept searched is found in the following 3 controversies.
Disputed term/author/ism Author Vs Author
Entry
Reference
Four-Dimensionalism Wiggins Vs Four-Dimensionalism
 
Books on Amazon
Simons I 115
WigginsVsFour Dimensionalism: der Unterschied zwischen einem vierdimensionalen Katzen-Prozess und einer Summe von Katzen-Teil-Prozessen ist,
I 116
dass die späteren Phasen der Summe unverbunden sein können, die des Katzen-Prozesses können aber nicht unverbunden sein. Summe: kann sich teilen – Prozess: nicht
Prozess; kann sich nicht teilen, Summe: kann es.
Summe: kann sich aufspalten, selbst wenn das nicht passiert.
Prozess: kann sich nicht aufspalten. (Logisch unmöglich).
Modality/de re/Summe/Prozess: Summe und Prozess unterscheiden sich also in der modality de re, obwohl sie als vierdimensionale Objekte zusammenfallen.
WigginsVsQuine: die modality ist in diesem Fall sogar referentiell transparent.
I 120
Tibbles-Bsp/Simons: i): die Ablehnung von i) (bzw. h)) erlaubt, Schritt (2) zurückzuweisen. Tib und Tibbles koinzidieren mereologisch zu t’, aber es reicht auch, die Superposition der beiden als Tatsache anzunehmen. Der positive Grund dafür, Tib und Tibbles niemals zu identifizieren, ist Leibniz’ Gesetz: sie unterscheiden sich, weil sie in den Eigenschaften differieren, die sie zu t haben. (Tib = Katze ohne Schwanz).
I 121
g),e): ihre Ablehnung blockiert den Schritt zu (5). Dass Tibbles zu t’ = Tib zu t’ beinhaltet dann nicht mehr, dass sie zu t identisch sind. f): seine Ablehnung bedeutet, Identität mit sortalen Prädikaten zu reformulieren: Bsp Tib ist dieselbe Katze wie Tibbles zu t’ und derselbe Katzen-Teil wie Tib zu t’. Aber wir können nicht schließen, dass Tib dieselbe Katze wie Tibbles zu t ist oder derselbe Katzen-Teil wie Tibbles zu t.
Damit ist die Transitivität blockiert.
d): es zu leugnen heißt zu leugnen, dass Tib (und Tail) zu t existieren, so dass die Frage nicht aufkommt, mit was sie identisch wären, was zu der Zeit existiert.
Problem: wenn Tib beim Unfall in die Existenz tritt, wie kann sie dann mit der vorher existierenden Tibbles identisch sein?
van Inwagen: akzeptiert a) und b) und h) sowie klassische Identität. Daher muss er entweder leugnen, dass etwas (Tib) anfängt zu existieren oder wie Chisholm: c) ablehnen.
Chisholm: Vs c).
Lösung/van Inwagen: Tibbles wird kleiner wenn der Schwanz weg ist, aber das einzige, was anfängt zu existieren, ist Tail (als Ganzes). SimonsVsInwagen, van: ist gegen den common sense und unnötig radikal. Es ist viel einfacher, h) oder i) abzulehnen.
Chisholm/Simons: ist weniger radikal in Bezug auf Identitätslogik oder auf continuants, aber radikaler als bloß h) oder i) zu leugnen. Denn c) zu leugnen blockiert das Argument schon in Schritt (2). Tibbles und Tib sind nicht identisch zu t’, obwohl sie sehr eng verbunden sind, weil sie beide zu der Zeit aus derselben mereologically constant ens per se konstituiert sind.

Wigg I
D. Wiggins
Essays on Identity and Substance Oxford 2016

Si I
P. Simons
Parts Oxford New York 1987
Inwagen, P. van Lewis Vs Inwagen, P. van
 
Books on Amazon
V 195
Individuation/Redundant Causation/Peter van Inwagen: Thesis: An event, which actually happens as a product of several causes, could not have happened had if it had not been the product of these causes. The causes could also not have led to another event.[ein Ereignis, das aktual passiert als Produkt mehrerer Ursachen, könnte nicht passiert sein, ohne das Produkt dieser Ursachen zu sein. Die Ursachen hätten auch kein anderes Ereignis zur Folge haben können.] Analogy to individuation of objects and humans because of their causal origins.
LewisVsInwagen:
1. It would ruin my analysis to analyze causation in terms of counterfactual dependence. ((s) Any deviation would be a different event, not comparable, no counterfactual conditionals applicable.) 2. It is prima facie implausible: I am quite able to legitimately establish alternative hypotheses how an event (or an object or a human being) was caused.
But then I postulate that it was one and the same event! Or that one and the same event could have had different effects.
(Even Inwagen postulates this.)
Plan/LewisVsInwagen: implies even more impossibilities: Either all my plans or hypotheses are hidden impossibilities or they do not even deal with particular event. [entweder sind meine ganzen Pläne oder Hypothesen versteckte Unmöglichkeiten, oder sie handeln gar nicht von einem bestimmten Ereignis.]
- - -
V 296
Vs weak determinism/VsCompatibilism/van InwagenVsLewis: (against wD which I pretend to represent): e.g. Suppose of reductio that I could have lifted my left hand although determinism would be true.
Then follows from four premises, which I cannot deny, that I could have created a wrong conjunction HL from a proposition H of a moment in time before my birth, and a certain proposition about a law L.
Premise 5: If yes, I could have made L wrong.
Premise 6: But I could not have made L wrong. (Contradiction.)
LewisVInwagen: 5 and 6 are both not true. Which one of both is true depends on what Inwage calls "could have made wrong". However, not in everyday language, but in Inwagen's artificial language. But it does not matter as well what Inwagen means himself!
What matters is whether we can actually give sense to it, which would make all premises valid without circularity.
Inwagen: (oral) third meaning for "could have made wrong": only iff the actor could have arranged the things in such a way that both his action and the whole truth about the previous history would have implied the wrongness of the proposition.
Then premise 6 states that I could not have arranged the things in such a way to make me predetermined to not arrange them. [dass ich die Dinge nicht hätte so arrangieren können, so dass ich prädeterminiert war, sie nicht so zu arrangieren.]
Lewis: But it is not instructive to see that compatibilism needs to reject premise 6 which is interpreted that way.
V 297
Falsification/Action/Free Will/Lewis: provisory definition: An event falsifies a proposition only when it is necessary that the proposition is wrong when an event happens. But my action to throw a stone is not going to falsify the proposition that the window which is on the other end of the trajectory will not be broken. The truth is that my action creates a different event which would falsify the proposition.
The action itself does not falsify a law. It would only falsify a conjunction of antecedent history and law.
The truth is that my action precedes another action, the miracle, and the latter falsifies the law.
[Alles was wahr ist ist, dass meinem Akt ein anderer Akt vorausgeht das Wunder und dieser falsifiziert das Gesetz.]
feeble: let's say I could make a proposition wrong in a weak sense iff I do something. The proposition would be falsified (but not necessarily because of my action, and not necessarily because of an event which happened because of my action). (Lewis pro
"Weak Thesis" ["Schwache These"] (Compatibilism)).
strong: If the proposition is falsified, either because of my action or because of an event that was caused because of my action.

Inwagen/Lewis: The first part of his thesis is strong, regardless of whether we advocate the strong or the weak thesis:
Had I been able to lift my hand, although determinism is true and I have not done so, then it is both true - according to the weak and strong sense- that I could have made the conjunctions HL (propositions about the antecedent history and the laws of nature) wrong.
But I could have made proposition L wrong in the weak sense, although I could not have done it wrong in the strong sense.
Lewis: If we advocate the weak sense, I deny premise 6.
If we advocate the strong sense, I deny premise 5.
Inwagen: Advocates both position by contemplating analogous cases.
LewisVsInwagen: I do believe that the cases are not analogous. They are cases in which the strong and the weak case do not diverge at all.
Premise 6/Inwagen: He invites us to reject the idea that a physicist could accelerate a particle faster than light.
LewisVsInwagen: But this does not contribute to support premise 6 in the weak sense

V 298
since the rejected assumption is that the physicist could falsify a law of nature in the strong sense. Premise 5/Inwagen: We should reject the assumption here that a traveller could falsify a conjunction of propositions about the antecedent history and the history of his future travel differently than a falsification of the non-historic part.
LewisVsInwagen: Reject the assumption as a whole if you would like to. It does not change anything: premise 5 is not supported in the strong sense. What would follow if a conjunction could be falsified in such a strong sense? Tht the non-historic part could be thus falsified in the strong sense? This is what would support premise 5 in the strong sense.
Or would simply follow (what I believe) that the non-historic part can be rejected in the weak sense? The example of the traveller is not helpful here because a proposition of future travels can be falsified in both weak as strong sense.[Oder würde bloß folgen, (was ich denke), dass man den nichthistorischen Teil im schwachen Sinn zurückweisen könnte? Das Bsp des Reisenden hilft hier nicht, weil eine Proposition über zukünftige Reisen sowohl im schwachen als auch im starken Sinn falsifiziert werde könnte.]
- - -
Schwarz I 28
Object/Lewis/Schwarz: Material things are accumulations or aggregates of such points. But not every collection of such points is a material object, e.g. [Bsp Alle Punktteile aller Katzen: manche liegen in Neuseeland, andere in Berlin, einige in der Gegenwart, andere im alten Ägypten.] Taken together they are neither constituting a cat nor any other object in the customary sense.
e.g. The same is valid for the aggregate of parts of which I am constituted of, together with the parts which constituted Hubert Humphrey at the beginning of 1968.
Thing: What is the difference between a thing in the normal sense and those aggregates? Sufficient conditions are difficult to find. Paradigmatic objects have no gaps, and holes are delimited from others, and fulfill a function. But not all things are of this nature, e.g. bikes have holes, bikinis and Saturn have disjointed parts. What we accept as a thing depends from our interests in our daily life. It depends on the context: e.g. whether we count the back wall or the stelae of the Holocaust Memorial or the screen or the keyboard as singly. But these things do also not disappear if we do not count them as singly!
Object/Thing/van Inwagen: (1990b) Thesis: Parts will constitute themselves to an object if the latter is a living being. So, there are humans, fishes, cats, but not computers, walls and bikinis.
Object/Thing/Lewis: better answer: two questions:
1. Under what conditions parts will form themselves to a whole? Under all conditions! For random things there is always a thing which constitutes them. (Def mereological Universalism/ > Quine).
2. Which of these aggregates do we call a singly thing in daily life? If certain aggregates are not viewed as daily things for us does not mean that they do not exist.(However, they go beyond the normal realms of our normal quantifiers.) But these restrictions vary from culture to culture. As such, it is not reality that is dependent on culture, but the respective observed part of reality (1986e, 211 213, 1991:79 81).
LewisVsInwagen/Schwarz: If only living things can form objects, evolution could not have begun. ((s) But if it is not a problem to say that living beings originated from emergentism, it should also not be a problem to say "objects" instead.)
LewisVsInwagen: no criteria for "living being" is so precise that it can clearly define.
Schw I 30
Lewis: It is not a problem for him: Conventions of the German language do not determine with atomic precision for which aggregates "living being" is accurate. (1986e, 212) LewisVsvan Inwagen: This explanation is not at his disposal: For him the distinction between living being and not a living being is the distinction between existence and non-existence. If the definition of living being is vague, the same is valid for existence as well.
Existence/Van Inwagen: (1990b. Kap.19) Thesis: some things are borderline cases of existence.
LewisVsvan Inwagen: (1991,80f,1983e,212f): If one already said "there is", then one has lost already: if one says that "something exists to a lesser degree".
Def Existence/Lewis: Simply means to be one of the things that exist.h
- - -
Schwarz I 34
Temporal Parts/van Inwagen: (1981) generally rejects temporal parts. SchwarzVsInwagen: THen he must strongly limit the mereological universalims or be a presentist.
- - -
Schwarz I 227
Modality/LewisVsInwagen: There are no substantial modal facts: The existence of possibilities is not contingent. [es gibt keine substantiellen modalen Tatsachen: was für Möglichkeiten es gibt, ist nicht kontingent.] Information about this cannot be obtained.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LW II
D. Lewis
Konventionen Berlin 1975

LW IV
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd I New York Oxford 1983

LW V
D. Lewis
Philosophical Papers Bd II New York Oxford 1986

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005
Stalnaker, R. Lewis Vs Stalnaker, R.
 
Books on Amazon
Read III 101/102
Stalnaker setzt die Wahrscheinlichkeit der Bedingungssätze mit der bedingten Wahrscheinlichkeit gleich. LewisVsStalnaker: es gibt keine Aussage, deren Wahrscheinlichkeit durch die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit gemessen wird! (+ III 102)
Nach Lewis ergibt sich, dass auf Grund von Stalnakers Annahme die Wahrscheinlichkeiten beim Kartenziehen unabhängig sind. Das ist aber offensichtlich falsch (im Gegensatz zum Würfeln). Also kann die Wahrscheinlichkeit des Bedingungssatzes nicht durch die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit gemessen werden.
III 108
Bsp von Lewis Wenn Bizet und Verdi Landsleute wären, wäre Bizet Italiener
und
Wenn Bizet und Verdi Landsleute wären, wäre Bizet nicht Italiener.
Stalnaker: die eine oder die andere muß wahr sein.
Lewis: beide sind falsch. (Weil nur konjunktivische Bedingungssätze nicht wahrheitsfunktional sind). Die indikativischen Stücke wären im Munde derjenigen, denen ihre Nationalität unbekannt ist, ganz akzeptabel.
- - -
Lewis IV 149
Handlung/Rationalität/Stalnaker: Propositionen sind hier die geeigneten Objekte von Einstellungen. LewisVsStalnaker: es stellt sich heraus, dass er eigentlich eine Theorie der Einstellungen de se braucht.
Stalnaker: der rational Handelnde ist jemand, der verschiedene mögliche rationale Zukünfte annimmt. Die Funktion des Wunschs ist einfach, diese verschiedenen Ereignisverläufe in die gewünschten und die abgelehnten zu unterteilen.
Oder eine Ordnung oder ein Maß für alternative Möglichkeiten zu liefern in bezug auf Wünschbarkeit.
Glauben/Stalnaker: seine Funktion ist es einfach, zu bestimmen, welchen die relevanten alternativen Situationen sein können, oder sie in Bezug auf ihre Wahrscheinlichkeit unter verschiedenen Bedingungen zu ordnen.
Einstellungsobjekte/Glaubensobjekte/Stalnaker: sind identisch dann und nur dann, wenn sie funktional äquivalent sind, und das sind sie nur dann, wenn sie sich in keiner alternativ möglichen Situation unterscheiden.
Lewis: wenn diese alternativen Situationen immer alternative MöWe sind, wie Stalnaker annimmt, dann ist das in der Tat ein Argument für Propositionen. ((s) Unterscheidung Situation/MöWe).
Situation/MöWe/Möglichkeit/LewisVsStalnaker: ich denke, es kann auch innerhalb einer einzelnen MöWe Alternativen geben!
Bsp Lingens weiß mittlerweile fast genug, um sich selbst zu identifizieren. Er hat seine Möglichkeiten auf zwei reduziert: a) er ist im 6. Stock der Stanford Bücherei, dann muss er treppab gehen oder
b) er ist im Untergeschoss der Bücherei des Widener College und muss treppauf gehen.
Die Bücher sagen ihm, dass es genau einen Menschen mit Gedächtnisverlust an jedem dieser Orte gibt. Und er hat herausgefunden, dass er einer der beiden sein muss. Seine Überlegung liefert 8 Möglichkeiten:
Die acht Fälle verteilen sich nur über vier Arten von Welten! Z.B. 1 und 3 gehören nicht zu verschiedenen Welten sondern sind 3000 Meilen entfernt in derselben Welt.
Um diese zu unterscheiden braucht man wieder Eigenschaften, ((s) Die Propositionen gelten für beide Gedächtniskünstler gleichermaßen.)
- - -
V 145
Konditionale/Wahrscheinlichkeit/Stalnaker: (1968) Schreibweise: "›" (spitz, nicht horseshoe!) Def Stalnaker Konditional: ein Konditional A › C ist wahr gdw. die geringstmögliche Änderung, die A wahr macht, auch C wahr macht. (Revision).
Stalnaker: vermutet, dass damit P(A › C) und P(C I A) angeglichen werden, wenn A positiv ist.
Die Sätze, die wie auch immer unter Stalnaker Bedingungen wahr sind, sind dann genau die, die positive Wschk haben unter seiner Hypothese über Wschk von Konditionalen.
LewisVsStalnaker: das gilt wohl meistens, aber nicht in gewissen modalen Kontexten, wo verschiedene Interpretationen einer Sprache die gleichen Sätze verschieden bewerten.
V 148
Konditional/Stalnaker: um zu entscheiden, ob man ein Konditional glauben soll: 1. füge das Antezedens zur Menge deiner Glaubenseinstellungen hinzu,
2. mache die nötigen Korrekturen für die Konsistenz
3. entscheide, ob das Konsequens wahr ist.
Lewis: das ist richtig für ein Stalnaker-Konditional, wenn die vorgetäuschte Revision durch Abbildung erfolgt.
V 148/149
LewisVsStalnaker: die Passage suggeriert, dass man die Art Revision vortäuschen soll, die stattfindet, wenn das Antezedens wirklich zu den Glaubenseinstellungen hinzugefügt würde. Aber das ist falsch: dann brauchte man Konditionalisierung. - - -
Schwarz I 60
Gegenstück/c.p./Gegenstücktheorie/c.p.th./Gegenstückrelation/c.p.r./StalnakerVsLewis: wenn man ohnehin fast beliebige Relationen als c.p.r. zulässt, könnte man auch nicht qualitativen Beziehungen verwenden. (Stalnaker 1987a): dann kann man c.p. mit dem Haecceitismus versöhnen: wenn man sich daran stößt, dass bei Lewis (x)(y)(x = y > N(x = y) falsch ist, (Lewis pro kontingente Identität, s.o.) kann man auch festlegen, dass ein Ding stets nur ein c.p. pro Welt hat. Stalnaker/Schwarz: das geht nicht mit qualitativen c.p.r., da immer denkbar ist, dass mehrere Dinge – Bsp in einer völlig symmetrischen Welt – einem dritten Ding in einer anderen MöWe genau gleich ähnlich sind.
LewisVsStalnaker: Vsnicht qualitative c.p.r.: alle Wahrheiten einschließlich modaler Wahrheiten sollen darauf beruhen, was für Dinge es gibt, (in der wirklichen Welt und möglichen Welten) und welche (qualitativen) Eigenschaften sie haben (>“Mosaik“).
- - -
Schwarz I 62
Mathematik/Wahrmachen/Tatsache/Lewis/Schwarz: wie bei MöWe gibt es keine eigentliche Information: Bsp dass 34 die Wurzel von 1156 ist, sagt uns nichts über die Welt. ((s) Dass es in jeder MöWe gilt. Regeln sind keine Wahrmacher). Schwarz: Bsp dass es niemand gibt, der die rasiert, die sich nicht selbst rasieren, ist analog keine Information über die Welt. ((s) Also nicht, dass die Welt qualitativ so aufgebaut ist).
Schwarz: vielleicht lernen wir hier eher etwas über Sätze. Es ist aber eine kontingente Wahrheit (!) , dass Sätze wie Bsp „es gibt jemand, der die rasiert, die sich nicht selbst rasieren“ inkonsistent ist.
Lösung/Schwarz: der Satz hätte etwas anderes bedeuten und damit konsistent sein können.
Schw I 63
scheinbar analytische Wahrheit/Lewis/Schwarz: Bsp was erfahren wir wenn wir erfahren, dass Ophtalmologen Augenärzte sind? Dass Augenärzte Augenärzte sind, wussten wir schon vorher. Wir haben eine kontingente semantische Tatsache erfahren. Modallogik/Modalität/modales Wissen/Stalnaker/Schwarz: These: modales Wissen könnte immer als semantisches Wissen verstanden werden. Bsp wenn wir fragen, ob Katzen notwendig Tiere sind, fragen wir, wie die Ausdrücke „Katze“ und „Tier“ zu gebrauchen sind. (Stalnaker 1991,1996, Lewis 1986e:36).
Wissen/SchwarzVsStalnaker: das reicht nicht: um kontingente Information zu erwerben, muss man immer die Welt untersuchen. (kontingent/Schwarz: empirisches, nicht semantisches Wissen).
Modale Wahrheit/Schwarz: der Witz an logischen, mathematischen und Modalen Wahrheiten ist gerade, dass sie ohne Kontakt mit der Welt gewusst werden können. Hier erwerben wir keine Information. ((s) >wahr machen: keine empirische Tatsache „in der Welt“ macht, dass 2+2 = 4 ist).
- - -
Schwarz I 207
„sekundäre Wahrheitsbedingungen“/truth conditions/tr.cond./semantischer Wert/WB/Lewis/Schwarz: zur Verwirrung trägt bei, dass die einfachen (s.o., kontextabhängige, ((s) „indexikalische) und variablen Funktionen von Welten auf Wahrheitswerte (WW) oft nicht nur als „semantische Werte“ sondern auch als WB bezeichnet werden. Wichtig: diese Wahrheitsbedingungen (tr.cond.) müssen von den normalen WB unterschieden werden.
Lewis: verwendet WB mal so mal so. 1986e,42 48: für primäre, 1969, Kap V: für sekundäre).
Def primäre WB/Schwarz: die Bedingungen, unter denen der Satz gemäß den Konventionen der jeweiligen Sprachgemeinschaft geäußert werden sollte.
WB/Lewis/Schwarz: sind das Bindeglied zwischen Sprachgebrauch und formaler Semantik ihre Bestimmung ist der Zweck der Grammatik.
Anmerkung:
Def Diagonalisierung/Stalnaker/Lewis/Schwarz: die primären tr.cond. erhält man durch Diagonalisierung, d.h. indem man als Welt Parameter die Welt der jeweiligen Situation einsetzt (entsprechend als Zeit Parameter den Zeitpunkt der Situation usw.).
Def „diagonale Proposition“/Terminologie/Lewis: (nach Stalnaker, 1978): primäre tr.cond.
Def horizontale Proposition/Lewis: sekundäre tr.cond. (1980a, 38, 1994b,296f).
Neuere Terminologie:
Def A-Intension/primäre Intension/1-Intension/Terminologie/Schwarz: für primäre tr.cond.
Def C-Intension/sekundäre Intension/2-Intension/Terminologie/Schwarz: für sekundäre tr.cond.
Def A-Proposition/1-Proposition/C-Proposition/2-Propsition/Terminologie/Schwarz: entsprechend. (Jackson 1998a,2004, Lewis 2002b,Chalmers 1996b, 56 65)
Def meaning1/ Terminologie/Lewis/Schwarz: (1975,173): sekundäre tr.cond.
Def meaning2/Lewis/Schwarz: komplexe Funktion von Situationen und Welten auf Wahrheitswerte, „zweidimensionale Intension“.
Schwarz: Problem: damit sind ganz verschiedene Dinge gemeint:
primäre tr.cond./LewisVsStalnaker: bei Lewis nicht über metasprachliche Diagonalisierung bestimmt wie Stalnakers diagonale Propositionen. Auch nicht über A priori-Implikation wie bei Chalmers primären Propositionen.
- - -
Schwarz I 227
a posteriori-Notwendigkeit/Metaphysik/Lewis/Schwarz: normale Fälle sind keine Fälle von starker Notwendigkeit. Man kann herausfinden Bsp dass Blair Premier ist oder Bsp Abendstern = Morgenstern. LewisVsInwagen/LewisVsStalnaker: andere Fälle (die sich empirisch nicht herausfinden lassen) gibt es nicht.
LewisVs starke Notwendigkeit: hat in seiner Modallogik keinen Platz. >LewisVs Teleskoptheorie: MöWe sind nicht wie ferne Planeten, bei denen man herausfinden kann, welche es wohl gibt.

LW I
D. Lewis
Die Identität von Körper und Geist Frankfurt 1989

LwCl I
Cl. I. Lewis
Mind and the World Order: Outline of a Theory of Knowledge (Dover Books on Western Philosophy) 1991

Re III
St. Read
Philosophie der Logik Hamburg 1997

Re IV
St. Read
Thinking About Logic: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic 1st Edition Oxford 1995

Schw I
W. Schwarz
David Lewis Bielefeld 2005

The author or concept searched is found in the following theses of the more related field of specialization.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Existence Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
Schw I 30
Existence / Van Inwagen: (1990b. Kap.19) some things are borderline cases of existence. LewisVsInwagen: (1991.80 f, 1983e, 212f): when you have already said "there is", then the game is already lost: when one says that "something exists to a lesser degree."
Def existence / Lewis: means simply to be one of the things that there are ((s) - "to be there" / "there are"/ existence, here: no difference, but still: Four dimensionalism see above pp 19.).