Dictionary of Arguments


Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 
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The author or concept searched is found in the following 3 entries.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Adolescence Hall Upton I 126
Adolescence/Hall/Upton: adolescence has been depicted as a tumultuous period, full of chaos and confusion caused by the ‘raging hormones’ brought about by puberty (Hall, 1904)(1). Indeed, (…) adolescence involves major physical transitions that include growth spurts, sexual maturation, hormonal changes and neurological development, in particular in the frontal lobes, an area of the brain linked to impulse control. It has also been argued that, for adolescents in Western cultures, there is a disjunction between biology and society. VsHall: >Adolescence/Psychological theories, >Adolescence/Anna Freud.


1. Hall, GS (1904) Adolescence: Its psychology and its relations to physiology, anthropology, sociology, sex, crime, religion and education. New York: Appleton.

EconHallR I
Robert E. Hall
The Streetcorner Strategy for Winning Local Markets: Right Sales, Right Service, Right Customers, Right Cost Austin 1999


Upton I
Penney Upton
Developmental Psychology 2011
Adolescence Mead Upton I 126
Adolescence/Mead, Margaret/Upton: adolescence has been depicted as a tumultuous period, full of chaos and confusion caused by the ‘raging hormones’ brought about by puberty (Hall, 1904)(1). Cf. >Adolescence/Anna Freud. VsHall: this image of the troubled or delinquent teenager was challenged as early as 1928(2) by Margaret Mead, who presented an account of the coming of age for Samoan adolescents that showed a very gradual and smooth transition from childhood to adulthood. The debate about storm and stress in adolescents is frequently mentioned in the literature (e.g., Arnett, 1999)(3); however, it seems that very few developmental psychologists still support this view. >Adolescence/Psychological theories.


1. Hall, GS (1904) Adolescence: Its psychology and its relations to physiology, anthropology, sociology, sex, crime, religion and education. New York: Appleton.
2. Mead, M (1928). Coming of Age in Samoa. A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilization.
3. Arnett. JJ (1999) Adolescent storm and stress reconsidered. American Psychologist, 54: 317-26.

Mead I
George Herbert Mead
Mind, Self, and Society from the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist (Works of George Herbert Mead, Vol. 1), Chicago 1967
German Edition:
Geist, Identität und Gesellschaft aus der Sicht des Sozialbehaviorismus Frankfurt 1973


Upton I
Penney Upton
Developmental Psychology 2011
Psychological Development Hall Upton I 10
Psychological Development/Hall/Upton: Thesis: children’s development recapitulates the evolution of the species. (Hall 1904(1); 1912(2); 1922(3)) VsHall: this belief has long since been discredited. However, he retains importance as a historical figure as he inspired a great deal of the work on human development.



1. Hall, G.S. (1904) Adolescence: Its psychology and its relations to physiology, anthropology, sociology, sex, crime, religion and education. New York: Appleton.
2. Hall, G.S. (1912) Founders of Modern Psychology. New York and London: Appleton.
3. Hall, G.S. (1922) Senescence. London and New York: Appleton.

EconHallR I
Robert E. Hall
The Streetcorner Strategy for Winning Local Markets: Right Sales, Right Service, Right Customers, Right Cost Austin 1999


Upton I
Penney Upton
Developmental Psychology 2011

The author or concept searched is found in the following controversies.
Disputed term/author/ism Author Vs Author
Entry
Reference
Various Authors Cresswell Vs Various Authors II 58
Computation/Cresswell: (representative: e.g. Moore/Hendrix, 1981) make it appear as if they have solved a problem which logicians have tried in vain to solve for years. CresswellVs: these are two completely different issues: ((s) The logicians are more concerned with the semantic one, the computation people with psychological issues). Content/Cresswell: (of a complement sentence) can be considered to be an equivalence class of all objects that are considered representations of this sentence. Belief objects/Moore/Hendrix (Hendrix 1981) some of these objects (the objects of mental states such as beliefs) are sentences in an internal language of the mind, others are in public language. There may be some that are in no language at all. (E.g. logical formulas).
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II 59
Content/Meaning/Cresswell: two sentences have the same meaning when they have the same content, providing they contain no index words. (5) The map indicates that the distance to Lower Moutere is 12 km.
... This requires each sentence to already have a meaning, so that the attitude is simply an attitude with regard to the meaning.
CresswellVsMoore/CresswellVsHendrix: i.e. we can only solve the problem of Moore and Hendrix if we already have a semantics.
Synonymy/Cresswell: if the synonymy relation ~~ (notation: in the book two swung dashes on top of each other) is defined like that, it can be set up compositionally for the whole language. I have no idea how this is supposed to work, but Hendrix and Moore refrain from it anyway. CresswellVsHendrix: they do not show how the synonymy classes are obtained.
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Hughes I 260
Non-standard systems/Hughes/Cresswell: have other basic operators as L and M. E.g. Halldén (1949b): limitation to a single three-digit operator which defines all other modal and truth-functional operators: [p, q, r] with the meaning that "either p is false or q is false or r is impossible" , i.e. (~p v ~q v ~Mr).
Then: negation, conjunction, possibility:
~a = def [a,a,a]
(a . b) = def [a,b[a, ~a,a]]
Ma = def ~[[a, ~a,a],[a ~a,a],a]

Hughes I 261
Hughes/CresswellVsHalldén: that makes an unnatural impression.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984

Hughes I
G.E. Hughes
Maxwell J. Cresswell
Einführung in die Modallogik Berlin New York 1978