Lexicon of Arguments


Philosophical and Scientific Issues in Dispute
 
[german]


 

Find counter arguments by entering NameVs… or …VsName.

The author or concept searched is found in the following 4 entries.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Attitude-Semantics Cresswell
 
Books on Amazon
I 64
Attitude Semantics/VsPossible World Semantics/Semantics of Possible Worlds/BarwiseVsCresswell: there are often two propositions, one of which is believed by the person, yet the other one is not, but still both are true in the same possible world - e.g. all logical and mathematical truths - but they are not all known, otherwise there could be no progress.
I 65
CresswellVs: the situations are to play roles that cannot be played simultaneously - solution: possible world semantics: the roles are played by entities of various kinds - solution: context with space-time indication - incorrect sentences: describe non-actual situations.
I 66
Sentences describe situations in a context - the context is itself a situation that provides the listener with time, place, etc. - Interpretation/Barwise: meaning of sentences in context.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984

Barcan-Formula Bigelow
 
Books on Amazon
The Barcan formula (x) Na > N(x)a

Barcan formula/BF/Bigelow/Pargetter: VsBarcan: one could argue that the intended interpretations of "necessary" falsifies the barcan formula.
E.g. "N" be it logically necessary that "and suppose some of the kinds of atheism are true, according to which everything must be localized spatial-temporally. Then we have
(x) (x is spatial)
But one could add that a given spatial thing - e.g. a screwdriver - logically impossible could be non-spatial.
To put it paradoxically, if this screwdriver had been non-spatial, it would not have been that screwdriver.

N (if the screwdriver ever exists, it is spatial)
In general
(x) N (if x exists, x is spatial) This has the form
(x) Na.
---
I 110
Barcan-formula/Bigelow/Pargetter: notes that ((x) NA > N (x)a).
That is, if the atheist accepts the Barcan-formula (together with the modus ponens) he is obliged to
N (x) a
That is,
N (Everything is so that if it exists, it is spatial)
Problem/VsBarcan/Bigelow/Pargetter. Many atheists would deny this. For the Barcan-formula would fix them on logical impossibility, although they proceed from a contingent fallacy.
Barcan-formula/(s): fixes the atheist to the conclusion that God is logically impossible, even if he proceeds from a contingent fact.
Barcan-formula/BF/Bigelow/Pargetter: we nevertheless plead for an acceptance of the Barcan-formula for modal realism, if it assumes the strictest interpretation of necessity.
But the reason arises only from semantics, not from logic.
N.B.: if we set up the semantics for a rejection of the Barcan-formula, we notice that we have to assume the Barcan-formula for this.
((s) question: does this not apply to any assertion of an impossibility of a thing?)
Modal Realism/Barcan Formula/BF/Bigelow/Pargetter: modal realism must therefore deny that it is contingent, what things there are. It is merely contingent on what things there are in the actual world, because it is contingent, which world is the actual world.
Possibilia: since the modal realism accepts Possibilia, it must say "there is a God or God could exist," but which is then, for him, equal with "God exists". And this already from the logical possibility! Because of its own interpretation of "there is".
"There is"/Interpretation/Bigelow/Pargetter/(s): can be interpreted differently: for modal realism it means, what is possible, exists also.
Barcan-Formula/BF/Bigelow/Pargetter: is an axiom that connects modal operators and quantifiers.
Similarly, Hughes/Cresswell's principle of predication:
Principle of Predication/Hughes/Cresswell/Bigelow/Pargetter: HC 1968, S 184-8):
(x) (Na v N~a) v (x) (Ma u M~a).
Everyday language translation/(s): all things have their properties either necessarily or possibly.
Bigelow/Pargetter: that divides all the properties (or conditions) that an object has to fulfill) in two kinds:
A) essences
B) accidents.
Principle of Predication/Hughes/Cresswell/Bigelow/Pargetter: is there to exclude properties that a thing could have essentially, but other things accidentally.
BigelowVsHughes/Cresswell/BigelowVsCresswell: you should not exclude such features! E.g. the property to be awake in the first hour of the year 1600 is accidental for Descartes, but essentially impossible for other objects.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990

Impossible World Hintikka
 
Books on Amazon
I 12
Impossible world/Hintikka: I believe that we must allow the impossible world to fight the problem of another kind of omniscience, the logical omniscience. ---
I 63
Impossible worlds/Logical omniscience/semantics of possible worlds/Hintikka: Thesis: the problem of omniscience does not occur here at all! E.g. (1) A sentence of the form "a knows that p" is true in a world W iff. P is true in all a-alternatives. That is, in all worlds, which are compatible with the knowledge of a.
Logical omniscience: their failure can be formulated like this:
(2) There is a, p and q such that a knows that p, p implies logically q, but a does not know that q.
Logical truth: is then analyzed model-theoretically:
(3) A sentence is logically true, iff. it is true in every logically possible world.
Problem: (1) - (3) are incompatible! However, they are not yet incompatible in the form given above, but only with the additional assumption:
(4) Every epistemically possible world is logically possible.
---
I 64
Problem: now it can be that in an epistemic a-alternative W'q is wrong! Problem: According to (4), these epistemic worlds are also logically possible.
However, according to the logical truth of (p > q) ((s) in this example), q must be true in any logically possible world. This results in the contradiction.
Solution: different authors have responded differently:
Positivism: positivism takes refuge in the noninformative (tautological) logical truth.
HintikkaVs: instead: semantics of possible worlds.
(4): already presupposes omniscience! It assumes that a can only eliminate seeming possibilities. This is circular.
Solution: there may be possibilities that appear only possible but contain hidden contradictions.
---
I 65
Problem: the problem here is (4) and not (2)! Solution/Hintikka: we have to allow worlds that are logically impossible, but still epistemically possible. ((s) unlike the impossible worlds discussed in Stalnaker and Cresswell.)
Then (1) - (3) can be true together. That is, in an epistemic world (p > q) can fail.
Impossible world/Hintikka: Problem as how we can allow it.
Impossible world/Cresswell/Hintikka: Cresswell proposes a reinterpretation of the logical constants. (Model theoretical).
HintikkaVsCresswell: the real problem with omniscience is that people do not recognize all the logical consequences of their knowledge. And this takes place in classical logic. Non-standard logic: bypasses the problem. You could say it destroys the problem instead of solving it.
---
I 65
Impossible world/Logical omniscience/Solution/Veikko RantalaVsHintikka: has solved some problems of this approach. ---
I 66
Nonclassical models: nonclassical models are for first level sentences. Impossible world/Rantala: are not "impossible" according to Rantala, but they differ from normal possible worlds, in the way that they are "changing worlds" by allowing new individuals.
However, in such a subtle way that they normally cannot be distinguished from invariant worlds (with always the same individuals). It is about:
Urn model/Statistics/Omniscience/Hintikka: whereby the variant worlds are such worlds with which moves from the urn possibly get new individuals into the game. But only so few that you may not notice it.

Hin I
Jaakko and Merrill B. Hintikka
The Logic of Epistemology and the Epistemology of Logic Dordrecht 1989

W I
J. Hintikka/M. B. Hintikka
Untersuchungen zu Wittgenstein Frankfurt 1996

Situation Semantics Barwise
 
Books on Amazon:
Jon Barwise
Cresswell II 169
Situation semantics/Barwise/Perry/Cresswell: (Barwise/Perry, 1983): here it is explicitly denied that logically equivalent sentences in contexts with propositional attitudes are interchangeable. (1983, 175, 1981b, 676f) - e.g. double negation in the attribution of propositional attitudes. - Solution: partial character of situations. - Not everything has to be given - or the speaker may have to suspend judgment. ("do not ...") - Def sentence meaning/Barwise/Perry: a relation between situations. - - -
Cresswell I 63
Situations-SemantikVsMöWe-Semantik/Wissen/Bedeutung/Barwise/Perry/BarweiseVsCresswell/ PerryVsCresswell/Cresswell: die möglichen Weltenseien zu groß um das zu erklären, was der Sprecher weiß, wenn er einen bedeutungsvollen Satz äußert. Mögliche Welten: sind vollständige mögliche Situationen.
Situations-Semantik: wir brauchen eine mehr partielle Art von Entität. ((s) partial, nichts vollständiges).
CresswellVsSituations-Semantik: (Cresswell 1985a, 168 ff, 1985b, Kapitel 7)
Lösung/Cresswell: These: die Situationen müssen nur in dem Sinn partiell sein, dass sie kleine Welten sind.
Def Abstrakte Situation/Barwise/Perry: (1983, 57 ff). sind theoretische Konstrukte, die für eine adäquate semantische Modellierung der Realität gebraucht werden, die aus realen Situationen besteht.
Cresswell: diese Unterscheidung ignoriere ich hier. Die Semantik möglicher Welten ist da besser, auch wenn man zwischen Realität und theoretischer Repräsentation unterscheidet.
Was wir vergleichen müssen, sind abstrakte Situationen und Welten.
I 64
Einstellungs-SemantikVsMöWe-Semantik/BarwiseVsCresswell: es gibt oft zwei Propositionen, von denen eine von der Person geglaubt wird, die andere aber nicht, aber dennoch beide in denselben Welten wahr sind – Bsp alle logischen und mathematischen Wahrheiten – aber sie werden nicht alle gewusst, sonst könnte es keinen Fortschritt geben.
I 65
CresswellVs: die Situationen sollen Rollen spielen, die gar nicht gleichzeitig gespielt werden können – Lösung: -Semantik möglicher Welten: die Rollen werden durch Entitäten verschiedener Art gespielt. Lösung: Kontext mit Raum-Zeit-Angabe – falsche Sätze: beschreiben nicht-aktuale Situationen.
I 66
Sätze beschreiben Situationen in einem Kontext – Kontext ist selbst eine Situation, die dem Hörer Zeit, Ort usw. liefert – Interpretation/Barwise: Bedeutung von Sätzen in einem Kontext. Bedeutung/CresswellVsSituations-Semantik/CresswellVsBarwise/CresswellVsPerry: Bedeutung: = Menge der Welten, in denen sie wahr sind.
Problem: Bedeutungen werden oft mit Propositionen gleichgesetzt und dann gibt es Probleme, dass sie Rollen spielen sollen, die sie nicht gleichzeitig spielen können.
I 67
Andererseits verhalten sich einige der anderen Dinge, die Barwise und Perry von Situationen verlangen, wie Welten! Bsp Mollie bellt
e*:= in l: bellt, Mollie, ja.
Das beschreibt eine Situation e gdw. e* < e. ((s) Teilmenge der Situationen, wo Mollie sonst noch bellt? Oder wo Mollie existiert und jemand bellt?).
Def Generierungseigenschaft/Terminologie/Cresswell: (generation property): haben solche Sätze, die eine Situation beschreiben ((s) die Teil einer Menge von Situationen ist). Ein Satz  hat die Generierungseigenschaft im Hinblick auf einen Kontext u, gdw. es eine Situation e* gibt, so dass
u [[φ]] e gdw. e* < e.
((s) Wenn es einen Satz gibt, der allgemeiner ist als der Satz „Mollie bellt in der Raum-Zeit-Situation l“ Oder: Generierungseigenschaft ist die Eigenschaft, die den Satz in den Kontext einbettet, weil Propositionen als Mengen von Welten nicht auf eine einzige Situation beschränkt sein dürfen).
Der Satz φ hat die Generierungseigenschaft schlechthin (simpliciter) gdw. er sie in jedem Kontext hat.
Atomsatz/BP: These alle atomaren Sätze haben die Generierungseigenschaft.
Cresswell: wenn Situationen als Propositionen aufgefasst werden, sollten alle Sätze die Generierungseigenschaft haben. Und zwar weil die generierende Situation e* als die Proposition aufgefaßt werden kann, die von dem Satz  im Kontext u ausgedrückt wird.
Tatsächlich brauchen wir die anderen Situationen gar nicht! Wir können sagen, dass e* die einzige Situation ist, die von  in u beschrieben wird. Aber das ist ohne Bedeutung, weil jedes e* die einzige Klasse von e’s bestimmt, so dass e* < e, und jede Klasse, die von einem e* generiert wird, bestimmt dieses e* eindeutig.

Barw I
J. Barwise
Situations and Attitudes Chicago 1999


Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984

The author or concept searched is found in the following 7 controversies.
Disputed term/author/ism Author Vs Author
Entry
Reference
Cresswell, M.J. Bigelow Vs Cresswell, M.J.
 
Books on Amazon
I 110
Principle of predication/Hughes/Cresswell/Bigelow/Pargetter: it exists in order to exclude properties that a thing could have essentially, but other things accidentallly. BigelowVsHughes/Cresswell/BigelowVsCresswell: such properties should not be excluded, however! E.g. The property of being at the first hour of the year 1600 is accidental for Descartes, but essentially impossible for other objects.

Big I
J. Bigelow, R. Pargetter
Science and Necessity Cambridge 1990
Cresswell, M.J. Hintikka Vs Cresswell, M.J.
 
Books on Amazon
Cresswell I 158
Game-Theoretical Semantics/GTS/Game Theory/Hintikka/Terminology/Cresswell: is actually not important for my purposes. I 159 HintikkaVsCresswell: Vs use of higher order entities. ((s) instead of 2nd order logic and instead branched quantifiers in order to re-establish compositionality). (Hintikka 1983, 281-285). CresswellVsHintikka/CresswellVsGame-Theoretical Semantics: 1) quantifies over higher-order entities itself, namely strategies! In particular, in the truth conditions for sentences like (28), despite Hintikka’s assertion that branched quantifiers would only mention individuals. (p 282). CresswellVsHintikka: 2) Def Truth/Game-Theoretical Semantics/Hintikka: consists in the existence of a winning strategy. If we formalize (x)(Ey)Fxy as Ef(x)Fxf(x), we are not involved in a move!
Move/Game Theory/Hintikka/Cresswell: consists of a single specific choice of nature of x and then a specific choice by me.
Sentence Meaning/CresswellVsHintikka: Important argument: then a single game can define the sentence meaning, and not represent how the speaker deals with it or represents its meaning.
Hintikka I 63
Logical Omniscience/Semantics of Possible Worlds/Possible World Semantics/Hintikka: the problem does not occur here! E.g. (1) A sentence of the form "a knows that p" is true in a possible world W iff. p is true in all a-alternatives. I.e. in all possible worlds that are compatible with the knowledge of a.
logical omniscience: its failure can be formulated as follows:
(2) There is a, p and q so that a knows that p, p logically implies q, but a does not know that q.
logical truth: is then model-theoretically analyzed:
(3) A sentence is logically true, iff it is true in every logically possible world. Problem: (1) - (3) are incompatible! However, they are not incompatible yet in the above given shape, but only with the additional assumption:
(4) Every epistemically possible world is logically possible.
I 64
Problem: now it may be that in an epistemic a-alternative W’q is false! Problem: according to (4), these epistemic worlds are also logically possible. Following the logical truth of (p>q) ((s) in this example) q must be true in any logically possible world. This creates the contradiction. Solution: different authors have different responds: Positivism: takes refuge in the non-informative of (tautological) logical truth. HintikkaVs: instead: possible world semantics. (4): already presumes omniscience! It assumes that a can already eliminate only apparent options. This is circular. Solution: There may be possibilities that only appear to be possible, but contain hidden contradictions.
I 65
Problem: the problem here is therefore (4) and not (2)! Solution/Hintikka: we must allow possible worlds which are logically impossible, but nevertheless epistemically possible ((s) other than the impossible worlds that are being discussed in Stalnaker and Cresswell. Then (1)-(3) can be true together, i.e. can in an epistemic possible world (p > q) can fail. Impossible World/Hintikka: Problem: how we can allow it. Impossible World/Cresswell/Hintikka: suggests a reinterpretation of the logical constants (model-theorically). HintikkaVsCresswell: the real problem with omniscience is that people do not recognize all the logical consequences of their knowledge and that takes place in classical logic. Non-standard logic: goes past the problem. One could say that it destroys the problem instead of solving it.

Hin I
Jaakko and Merrill B. Hintikka
The Logic of Epistemology and the Epistemology of Logic Dordrecht 1989

W I
J. Hintikka/M. B. Hintikka
Untersuchungen zu Wittgenstein Frankfurt 1996

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984
Cresswell, M.J. Cresswell Vs Cresswell, M.J.
 
Books on Amazon
I 126
Necessity/Necessary existence/Self-criticism/CresswellVsCresswell: (and Hughes/Cresswell I 191): (35) represents an interpretation that we proposed in HC for E.g. "the man next door = the Major" as a necessary truth. I’m afraid that’s unnatural. Properties/Chisholm/(s): unreal examples "living opposite": creates no resemblance to other things that also have this property. Real Properties create similarity among the things that have them. E.g. red, round, etc. On the other hand: E.g. All neighbors of Schmidt have the basement full of water": is certainly a similarity, but being a neighbor of Schmidt is part of the explanation here (with hidden premises), but not a property that makes the persons similar.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988
Cresswell, M.J. Stechow Vs Cresswell, M.J.
 
Books on Amazon
I 154
Lambda-Operator/λ-Operator/Stechow: die hier verwendete Sprache entspricht ziemlich genau der λ-kategorialen von Cresswell 1973. Einziger Unterschied: Cresswell: bei ihm kein Unterschied zwischen syntaktischen Kategorien und Typen. Die Typensymbole fungieren gleichzeitig als Kategoriensymbole.
StechowVsCresswell: das ist unpraktisch, weil verschiedene Kategorien denselben Typ haben können.
Bsp intransitive Verben als auch Nomina sind vom Typ ep.
Hier: wählen wir eine Sprache mit Bedeutung*stypen, also e, p usw.
Lambda-Operator/Semantik/Linguistik/Stechow: dient der Interpretation des Bewegungsindex. Damit übertragen sich die logischen Eigenschaften des Operators auf die Interpretation der Bewegung.
Bewegung: (auf LF) erzeugt einen Lambda-Operator, der seine Spur bindet und damit alle gleichen Variablen (Pronomina) die er c kommandiert.
1. Interpretation: eines geschlossenen Ausdrucks hängt nicht von der Wahl einer bestimmten Belegung ab. Das ist eine Folge des sogenannten
Def Koinzidenzlemma: das besagt, dass zwei Ausdrücke, die sich nur durch freie Variablen unterschieden, durch geeignete Belegungen gleich interpretiert werden können.
2. Die Syntax der λ-Sprache beinhaltet das Prinzip der
Def λ-Konversion, das unsere Funktionskonversion ist. Das Prinzip besagt, dass man einen λ-Operator abbauen darf, wenn man für die durch den Operator gebundenen Variablen einen Ausdruck vom Typ der Variablen einsetzt. Das folgt aus dem >Überführungslemma. (>Bindung).
3. gebundene Umbenennung/Stechow: wenn zwei Ausdrücke nur in der Wahl ihrer gebundenen Variablen unterscheiden, bedeuten sie dasselbe. ^Das sind die alphabetischen Varianten.
A. von Stechow
I Arnim von Stechow Schritte zur Satzsemantik
www.sfs.uniï·"tuebingen.de/~astechow/Aufsaetze/Schritte.pdf (26.06.2006)
Lewis, D. Cresswell Vs Lewis, D.
 
Books on Amazon
I 23
Performance/Competence/Semantic/Cresswell: what relationships are there between the two of them? Lewis: Convention of truthfulness and trust: in L: thesis: most language use is based on it.
---
I 24
We assume that the speakers are trying to express true sentences and we expect the same from others. Important argument/CresswellVsLewis: this may be the case, but to me it seems to be more a matter of empirical investigation than a definition that it should be so. And therefore:
---
I 33
Language/Bigelow/Cresswell: John Bigelow tells me, thesis: that one of the earliest functions of language was storytelling. Then it is more about imagination than everyday communication! ((s)VsCresswell: 1) How does Bigelow know that? 2) Why should one draw such far-reaching conclusions from that). CresswellVsLewis: even if it should turn out that there was a logical link between the convention and the use of language, it seems better to me not to include this in a theory of semantics from the start. Anyway, we do not need a connection of competence and performance.
---
II 142
Fiction/Belief de re/Lewis/Cresswell: (Lewis 1981, 288): E.g. In France, children believe that Papa Noel brings gifts to all children; in England, Father Christmas only brings them to the good children (and these get twice as many gifts, as Pierre calculates). De re/Fiction/Lewis: this cannot be an attitude de re, because there is no such res in both cases.
Fiction/CresswellVsLewis: here you can also have a reference de re, even if the causal connection is not direct.
Solution/Devitt: storytelling.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984
Quine, W.V.O. Davidson Vs Quine, W.V.O.
 
Books on Amazon
I 41
Quine connects meaning and content with the firing of sensory nerves (compromise proposal) This makes his epistemology naturalistic. - DavidsonVsQuine: Quine should drop this (keep naturalism) but what remains of empiricism after deducting the first two dogmas. - DavidsonVsQuine: names: "Third Dogma" (> Quine, Theories and Things, Answer) dualism of scheme and content. Davidson: Scheme: Language including the ontology and world theory contained in it; I 42 - Content: the morphological firing of the neurons. Argument: something like the concept of uninterpreted content is necessary to make the concept relativism comprehensible. In Quine neurological replacement for sensory data as the basis for concept relativism. Davidson: Quine separation of scheme and content, however, becomes clear at one point: (Word and Object). Quine: "... by subtracting these indications from the worldview of people, we get the difference of what he contributes to this worldview. This difference highlights the extent of the conceptual sovereignty of the human, the area where he can revise his theories without changing anything in the data." (Word and Object, beginning) I 43 - Referring to QuineVsStroud: "everything could be different": we would not notice... -DavidsonVsQuine: Is that even right? According to the proximal theory, it could be assumed: one sees a rabbit, someone else sees a warthog and both say: Gavagai! (Something similar could occur with blind, deaf, bats or even with low-level astigmatism. The brains in the tank may be wrong even to the extent that Stroud feared. But everyone has a theory that preserves the structure of their sensations.
I 55
So it is easy to understand Cresswell when he says CreswellVsQuine: he has an empire of reified experiences or phenomena which confronts an inscrutable reality. QuineVsCresswell> Quine III) -
I 64
DavidsonVsQuine: he should openly advocate the distal theory and recognize the active role of the interpreter. The speaker must then refer to the causes in the world that both speak and which are obvious for both sides.
I 66
DavidsonVsQuine: His attempt is based on the first person, and thus Cartesian. Nor do I think we could do without some at least tacitly agreed standards. ProQuine: his courageous access to epistemology presented in the third person.
II 93
 Quine: ontology only physical objects and classes - action not an object - DavidsonVsQuine: action: event and reference object. Explicating this ontology is a matter of semantics. Which entities must we assume in order to understand a natural language?
I 165
McDowell: World/Thinking/Davidson: (according to McDowell): general enemy to the question of how we come into contact with the empirical world. There is no mystery at all. No interaction of spontaneity and receptivity. (DavidsonVsQuine) Scheme/Content/Davidson: (Third Dogma): Scheme: Language in Quine - Content: "empirical meaning" in Quine. (I 165) Conceptual sovereignty/Quine: can go as far as giving rise to incommensurable worldviews. DavidsonVsQuine: experience cannot form a basis of knowledge beyond our opinions. It would otherwise have to be simultaneously inside and outside the space of reason.

Fodor/Lepore IV 225
Note
13.> IV 72
Radical Inerpretation/RI/Quine: his version is a first step to show that the concept of linguistic meaning is not scientifically useful and that there is a "large range" in which the application can be varied without empirical limitation. (W + O, p. 26> conceptual sovereignty). DavidsonVsQuine: in contrast to this: RI is a basis for denying that it would make sense to claim that individuals or cultures had different conceptual schemes.

D I
D. Davidson
Der Mythos des Subjektiven Stuttgart 1993

D III
D. Davidson
Handlung und Ereignis Frankfurt 1990

D IV
D. Davidson
Wahrheit und Interpretation Frankfurt 1990
Quine, W.V.O. Verschiedene Vs Quine, W.V.O. Davidson I 55
CreswellVsQuine : er habe ein Reich reifizierter Erfahrungen oder Erscheinungen, welches einer unerforschlichen Realität gegenüberstehe. Davidson pro - - QuineVsCresswell >Quine III) - - -
Kanitscheider II 23
Ontologie/Sprache/Mensch/Kanitscheider: die sprachlichen Produkte des Organismus sind keinesfalls durch eine ontologische Kluft von seinem Produzenten getrennt. Ideen sind bestimmte neuronale Muster im Organismus.
KanitscheiderVsQuine: Schwachpunkt: sein Empirismus. Man muß seine Epistemologie daher mehr als ein Forschungsprogramm ansehen.
- - -
Quine VI 36
VsQuine: man hat mir vorgehalten, dass es sich bei der Frage "Was gibt es?" allemal um eine Tatsachenfrage handelt, und nicht um ein rein sprachliches Problem. Ganz recht. QuineVsVs: doch sagen oder voraussetzen, was es gibt, bleibt eine sprachliche Angelegenheit und hier sind die gebundenen Variablen am Platz.
- - -
VI 51
Bedeutung/Quine: die Suche nach ihr sollte bei den ganzen Sätzen beginnen. VsQuine: die These der Unbestimmtheit der Übersetzung führe geradewegs zum Behaviorismus. Andere: sie führe zu einer reductio ad absurdum von Quines eigenen Behaviorismus.
VI 52
Übersetzungsunbestimmtheit/Quine: sie führt tatsächlich zum Behaviorismus, an dem kein Weg vorbei führt. Behaviorismus/Quine: in der Psychologie hat man noch die Wahl, ob man Behaviorist sein will, in der Sprachwissenschaft ist man dazu gezwungen. Man erwirbt Sprache über das Verhalten anderer, das im Lichte einer gemeinsamen Situation ausgewertet wird.
Es ist dann buchstäblich gleichgültig, welcher Art außerdem noch das psychische Leben ist!
Semantik/Quine: in die semantische Bedeutung wird mithin nicht mehr eingehen können als das, was wahrnehmbarem Verhalten in beobachtbaren Situationen auch zu entnehmen ist
- - -
Quine XI 146
Stellvertreterfunktion/Quine/Lauener: braucht gar nicht eindeutig zu sein. Bsp Charakterisierung von Personen aufgrund ihres Einkommens: hier werden dadurch einem Argument verschiedene Werte zugeordnet. Dazu brauchen wir eine Hintergrundtheorie: wir bilden das Universum U in V so ab, dass sowohl die Objekte von U als auch ihre Stellvertreter in V enthalten sind. Falls V eine Teilmenge von U bildet, kann U selbst als
Hintergrundtheorie funktionieren, innerhalb der ihre eigene ontologische Reduktion beschrieben wird.
XI 147
VsQuine: das ist gar keine Reduktion, denn dann müssen die Objekte doch existieren. QuineVsVs: das ist mit einer reductio ad absurdum vergleichbar: wenn wir zeigen wollen, dass ein Teil von U überflüssig ist, dürfen wir für die Dauer des Arguments U voraussetzen. (>Ontologie/Reduktion).
Lauener: das bringt uns zur ontologischen Relativität.
Löwenheim/Ontologie/Reduktion/Quine/Lauener: wenn eine Theorie von sich aus einen überabzählbaren Bereich erfordert, können wir keine Stellvertreterfunktion mehr vorlegen, die eine Reduktion auf einen abzählbaren Bereich ermöglichen würde.
Denn dazu brauchte man eine wesentlich stärkere Rahmentheorie, die dann nicht mehr nach Quines Vorschlag als reductio ad absurdum wegdiskutiert werden könnte.
- - -
Quine X 83
Logisch wahr/Gültigkeit/Quine: unsere Einsetzungs Definitionen (Sätze statt Mengen) gebrauchen einen Begriff der Wahrheit und der Erfüllung, der über den Rahmen der Objektsprache hinausgeht. Diese Abhängigkeit vom Begriff der ((s) einfachen) Wahrheit beträfe übrigens genauso die Modell Definition der Gültigkeit und logischen Wahrheit.
Daher haben wir Anlass, uns noch eine 3. Möglichkeit der Definition der Gültigkeit und der logischen Wahrheit anzusehen: sie kommt ohne die Begriffe der Wahrheit und Erfüllung aus: wir brauchen dazu den Vollständigkeitssatz ((s) >Beweisbarkeit).
Lösung: wir können einfach die Schritte festlegen, die eine vollständige Beweismethode bilden und dann:
Def gültiges Schema/Quine: ist eines, das mit solchen Schritten bewiesen werden kann.
Def logisch wahr/Quine: wie vorher: ein Satz der aus einem gültigen Schema durch Einsetzen anstelle seiner einfachen Sätze hervorgeht.
Beweisverfahren/Beweismethode/Quine: einige vollständige beziehen sich nicht notwendig auf Schemata, sondern lassen sich auch direkt auf die Sätze anwenden,
X 84
Die aus dem Schema durch Einsetzen hervorgehen. Solche Methoden erzeugen wahr e Sätze direkt aus anderen wahren Sätzen. Dann können wir Schemata und Gültigkeit beiseite lassen und logische Wahrheit als Satz definieren, der durch diese Beweisverfahren erzeugt wird.
1. VsQuine: das pflegt Protest auszulösen: die Eigenschaft, „durch eine bestimmte Beweismetoode beweisbar zu sein“ sei an sich uninteressant. Interessant sei sie erst aufgrund des Vollständigkeitssatzes, der die Beweisbarkeit mit der logischen Wahrheit gleichzusetzen erlaubt!
2. VsQuine: wenn man logische Wahrheit indirekt durch Bezug auf eine geeignete Beweismethode definiert, entzieht man damit dem Vollständigkeitssatz den Boden. Er wird inhaltsleer.
QuineVsVs: die Gefahr besteht gar nicht: Der Vollständigkeitssatz in der Formulierung (B) hängt nicht davon ab, wie wir logische Wahrheit definieren, denn sie wird gar nicht erwähnt! Ein Teil seiner Bedeutung liegt aber darin, dass er zeigt, dass wir logische Wahrheit durch die bloße Beschreibung der Beweismethode definieren können, ohne etwas von dem zu verlieren, was die logische Wahrheit erst interessant macht.
Äquivalenz/Quine: wichtig sind Lehrsätze, die eine Äquivalenz zwischen ganz verschieden Formulierungen eines Begriffs – hier der logischen Wahrheit – feststellen. Welche Formulierung dann die offizielle Definition genannt wird, ist weniger wichtig.
Aber auch bloße Bezeichnungen können besser oder schlechter sein.
Gültigkeit/logische Wahrheit/Definition/Quine: die elementare Definition hat den Vorteil, dass sie für mehr Nachbarprobleme relevant ist.
3. VsQuine: bei der großen Willkür der Wahl des Beweisverfahrens ist nicht ausgeschlossen, dass das Wesentliche der logischen Wahrheit nicht erfasst ist.
QuineVsVs: wie willkürlich ist denn die Wahl eigentlich? Sie beschreibt das Verfahren unhd spricht über Zeichenfolgen. In dieser Hinsicht entspricht sie der Satz .Einsetzungs Definition. Sie bewegt sich effektiv auf der Ebene der eZT. Und sie bleibt auf der Ebene, während die andere Definition den Begriff der Wahrheit gebraucht. Das ist ein großer Unterschied.





D I
D. Davidson
Der Mythos des Subjektiven Stuttgart 1993

D IV
D. Davidson
Wahrheit und Interpretation Frankfurt 1990

Kan I
B. Kanitscheider
Kosmologie Stuttgart 1991

Kan II
B. Kanitscheider
Im Innern der Natur Darmstadt 1996

Q I
W.V.O. Quine
Wort und Gegenstand Stuttgart 1980

Q II
W.V.O. Quine
Theorien und Dinge Frankfurt 1985

Q III
W.V.O. Quine
Grundzüge der Logik Frankfurt 1978

Q IX
W.V.O. Quine
Mengenlehre und ihre Logik Wiesbaden 1967

Q V
W.V.O. Quine
Die Wurzeln der Referenz Frankfurt 1989

Q VI
W.V.O. Quine
Unterwegs zur Wahrheit Paderborn 1995

Q VII
W.V.O. Quine
From a logical point of view Cambridge, Mass. 1953

Q VIII
W.V.O. Quine
Bezeichnung und Referenz
In
Zur Philosophie der idealen Sprache, J. Sinnreich (Hg), München 1982

Q X
W.V.O. Quine
Philosophie der Logik Bamberg 2005

Q XII
W.V.O. Quine
Ontologische Relativität Frankfurt 2003

The author or concept searched is found in the following theses of the more related field of specialization.
Disputed term/author/ism Author
Entry
Reference
Situation Semantics Perry, J.
 
Books on Amazon
Cresswell I 63
Situations-SemantikVsMöWe-Semantik/Wissen/Bedeutung/Barwise/Perry/BarweiseVsCresswell/ PerryVsCresswell/Cresswell: die MöWe seien zu groß um das zu erklären, was der Sprecher weiß, wenn er einen bedeutungsvollen Satz äußert. MöWe: sind vollständige mögliche Situationen.
Situations-Semantik: wir brauchen eine mehr partielle Art von Entität. ((s) partial, nichts vollständiges).
CresswellVsSituations-Semantik: (Cresswell 1985a, 168 ff, 1985b, Kapitel 7)
Lösung/Cresswell: These die Situationen müssen nur in dem Sinn partiell sein, daß sie kleine MöWe sind.
I 64
Einstellungs-Semantik/Cresswell: (Cresswell 1985b) These: ich verteidige den Zugang zu prop Einst über MöWe-Semantik.
I 73
BP: These damit Joe sieht, daß Sally raucht oder nicht raucht müßte er entweder sehen wie sie raucht oder sehen, wie sie nicht raucht.

Cr I
M. J. Cresswell
Semantical Essays (Possible worlds and their rivals) Dordrecht Boston 1988

Cr II
M. J. Cresswell
Structured Meanings Cambridge Mass. 1984