Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Twodimensional semantics: Twodimensional are semantics that take into account both the properties of a situation described by a statement and the properties of the utterance situation (which need not be identical with the described situation). For example, the statement that one is at location A, B or C is true when it is uttered at location A, B or C (diagonalization). Statements of a particular form are always true, e.g. "I am here now". In this case, the entire two-dimensional matrix is assigned the value "true". Two-dimensional semantics go back to D. Kaplan (D. Kaplan, Demonstratives, in Perry & Wettstein (Eds.) Themes from Kaplan, Oxford, 1989, pp. 481-563). See also context/context dependency, diagonalization, diagonal propositions, A-intensions, C-intensions, Stalnaker intensions, character, content.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
Author Item    More concepts for author
Jackson, Frank C. Twodimensional Semantics   Jackson, Frank C.
Kaplan, D. Twodimensional Semantics   Kaplan, D.
Lewis, David Twodimensional Semantics   Lewis, David
Stalnaker, R. Twodimensional Semantics   Stalnaker, R.


Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-20