Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Substitutional Quantification: the substitutional quantification is concerned with the determination of whether linguistic expressions can be formed for a situation. E.g. "There is a true sentence that ...". In contrast, the referential quantification - the form of quantification normally used in predicate logic - tells us something about objects. E.g. "There is at least one object x with the property ..." or "For all objects x applies ...". The decisive difference between the two types of quantification is that, in the case of the possible replacement of a linguistic expression by another expression, a so-called substitution class must be assumed which cannot exist in the case of objects since the everyday subject area is not classified into classes is. E.g. you can replace a table by some box, but you cannot replace the word table by any available word. See also referential quantification, quantification, substitution, inference, implication, stronger/weaker, logic, systems, semantic rise.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
Author Item    More concepts for author
Belnap, Nuel Substitutional Quantification   Belnap, Nuel
Field, Hartry Substitutional Quantification   Field, Hartry
Hintikka, J. Substitutional Quantification   Hintikka, J.
Kripke, Saul Aaron Substitutional Quantification   Kripke, Saul Aaron
Quine, Willard Van Orman Substitutional Quantification   Quine, Willard Van Orman
Schiffer, Stephen Substitutional Quantification   Schiffer, Stephen

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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-11-21