Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Order, philosophy: order is the division of a subject area by distinctions or the highlighting of certain differences as opposed to other differences. The resulting order can be one-dimensional or multi-dimensional, i.e. linear or spatial. Examples are family trees, lexicons, lists, alphabets. It may be that only an order makes certain characteristics visible, e.g. contour lines. Ordering spaces may be more than three-dimensional, e.g. in the attribution of temperatures to color-determined objects. See also conceptual space, hierarchies, distinctness, indistinguishability, stratification, identification, individuation, specification.
 
Author Item    More concepts for author
Allen, C. Order   Allen, C.
Aristotle Order   Aristotle
Bigelow, John Order   Bigelow, John
Carnap, Rudolf Order   Carnap, Rudolf
Cicero Order   Cicero
Cresswell, M.J. Order   Cresswell, M.J.
Dennett, Daniel Order   Dennett, Daniel
Descartes, R. Order   Descartes, R.
Feyerabend, Paul Order   Feyerabend, Paul
Feynman, Richard Order   Feynman, Richard
Foucault, M. Order   Foucault, M.
Genz, H. Order   Genz, H.
Hume, D. Order   Hume, D.
Kauffman, Stuart Order   Kauffman, Stuart
Leibniz, G.W. Order   Leibniz, G.W.
Locke, John Order   Locke, John
Lorenz, Konrad Order   Lorenz, Konrad
Luhmann, Niklas Order   Luhmann, Niklas
Mayr, E. Order   Mayr, E.
Monod, J. Order   Monod, J.
Quine, Willard Van Orman Order   Quine, Willard Van Orman
Rawls, J. Order   Rawls, J.
Saussure, F. de Order   Saussure, F. de
Simons, Peter Order   Simons, Peter
Stalnaker, R. Order   Stalnaker, R.
Strawson, Peter F. Order   Strawson, Peter F.
Thiel, Chr. Order   Thiel, Chr.
Vollmer, Gerhard Order   Vollmer, Gerhard
Wessel, H. Order   Wessel, H.


Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-23