Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Goals, philosophy: a goal is an unrealized state, which is striven for by a positive idea. Some authors assume that even higher animals can have goals. In idealistic philosophy there is the thesis that history as a whole has a goal. See also psychology, pragmatism, history, teleology, fatalism.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
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Books on Amazon:
Peter Gärdenfors
I 63
Goals/Intention/Intent/Language acquisition/Semantics/Gärdenfors: to represent intentions, the goal must already be represented.
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I 64
Conceptual space/semantic domain: can be a product space of physical space with itself. The goal is then a vector with the endpoints agent and target object, or their localization.
Vectors: target vectors can be more abstract than motion vectors. They can be defined in all semantic domains. The classic case is Newell and Simons (1972) General Problem Solver. The target spaces can be viewed as metaphorical transmissions of physical space, with the key concept still being the distance.
Spatial metaphors: are omnipresent in our everyday language. See Lakoff & Johnson (1980).


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Gä I
P. Gärdenfors
The Geometry of Meaning Cambridge 2014


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-10-23