Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Intuitionism: A) intuitionism in mathematics assumes that the objects to be inspected, e.g. numbers are only constructed in the process of the investigation and are therefore not ready objects, which are discovered. This has an effect on the double negation and the sentence of the excluded middle.
B) Intuitionism of ethics assumes that moral principles are fixed and are immediately (or intuitively) knowable.


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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
P. Lorenzen Ein dialogisches Konstruktivitätskriterium (1959) in Karel Berka/L. Kreiser Logik Texte Berlin, 1983

Berka I 269
Intuitionist/classical logic/Lorenzen: If the intuitionist logic has been constructively justified in this way, the interpretation of the classical logic is, for example, by means of the elimination of v,>, universal quantification is no longer a problem.
Quantification: however, the use of quantifiers is bound to the condition that the assertions that an element belongs to a quantified variable already have a dialogically definite meaning.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Lorn I
P. Lorenzen
Constructive Philosophy Cambridge 1987

Brk I
K. Berka/L. Kreiser
Logik Texte Berlin 1983


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-21