Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Desire: desire is a linguistically formulated attitude or an attitude that can be formulated for imagined or actually given situations or objects. It may be desired to possess an object or to realize or terminate states or situations. A special case is unconscious desires, which can ultimately be identified only by attributing a linguistic form. In this way one can ascribe desires to animals. See also imagination, commands, sentences, propositions, attribution.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon:
Patricia Churchland
II Patricia Smith Churchland Die Neurobiologie des Bewusstseins - Was können wir von ihr lernen? In Hügli/Lübcke (Hrsg) Philosophie im 20. Jahrhundert, Reinbek 1993
II 467
"Desire"/"Belief"/Churchland: Paul and Patricia Churchland: we will probably have to drop those "categories".
FodorVsChurchland, SearleVsChurchland.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Churla I
Paul M. Churchland
Matter and Consciousness Cambridge 2013

Churli I
Patricia S. Churchland
Touching a Nerve: Our Brains, Our Brains New York 2014


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-08-23