Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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I, philosophy: A) The expression of a speaker for the subject or the person who is herself. The use of this expression presupposes an awareness of one's own person. B) The psychical entity of a subject that is able to relate to itself. C. Self, philosophy the concept of the self cannot be exactly separated from the concept of the I. Over the past few years, more and more traditional terms of both concepts have been relativized. In particular, a constant nature of the self or the I is no longer assumed today. See also brain/brain state, mind, state of mind, I, subjects, perception, person.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 101
I/Consciousness/Frith: Problem: we are good at grasping, but we know very little about the distribution of our body parts in space.
Knowing what we know about it is sometimes wrong: wrong knowledge.
Higher level: here, knowledge is stored about the time and type of change.
Next level: that I am the acting person. Even here I can be wrong.
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I 224
I/Self/Frith: I experience myself as an island of stability in a constantly changing world.
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I 246
I/Self/Frith: Thesis: the "I" is created by my brain.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Frith I
Chris Frith
Wie unser Gehirn die Welt erschafft Heidelberg 2013


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-08-16