Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Cartesianism: (goes back to René Descartes) the thesis that we must distinguish between extended entities (bodies, matter, res extensa) and unextended entities (spirit, soul). See also Dualism.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 6
Cartesianism/Dualism/Boer: a dualist might say that some things are localized in time, but not in space.

Theorem (T1): follows from (P ^) and (D1)

(T1) Everything that participates in the world exists.

(D1) Definition "X participates/participation in the world": If X is an individual, then it exists localized in the space time, if X is a proposition, it exists and is true. If X is a state, it exists and persists. If X is a property or relation, then it exists and is exemplified. If X is an event, then it exists and X occurs.

Non-actuality/Boer: would say that non-existent things can no longer participate in the world, as unexamplified properties.

Therefore (D1) can be accepted by actualists as well as by non-actualists.
The converse of (T1) is controversial:
Tolerant actualismVs(T1).


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Boer I
Steven E. Boer
Thought-Contents: On the Ontology of Belief and the Semantics of Belief Attribution (Philosophical Studies Series) New York 2010

Boer II
Steven E. Boer
Knowing Who Cambridge 1986


> Counter arguments against Boer
> Counter arguments in relation to Cartesianism



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-06-28