Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Determinates/Determinables: Determinables are expressions for something that allows further specifications due to language usage. E.g. the form, color, etc., are determinables, which are determined further by determinates such as "elongated", "light green," and so on. The term was introduced by W.E. Johnson (Johnson, W.E., 1921, Logic (Part 1), Cambridge). See also specification, determinateness, individuation, identification, ontology.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 19
Definition "determinate"/determinate/Millikan: determinate is a property relative to a "determinable" property under which both this property and a lot of other properties fall.
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I 20
For example, red (together with its opposite green, yellow, etc.) is a determinate property relative to "colored". ((s) "colored": = determinable).
E.g. purple: is determinate relative to both red and also to colored.
(2) The fact that A and B have the properties p1, p2, p3, etc. in common can be explained by a natural law or laws in situ that satisfy condition (3) (see below).


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Millk I
R. G. Millikan
Language, Thought, and Other Biological Categories: New Foundations for Realism Cambridge 1987


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-25