Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Nature, philosophy: nature is usually defined as the part of reality that was not made or designed by humans. No properties can be attributed to nature. E.g. since contradiction is ultimately a language problem, one can say that nature cannot be contradictory. Not all forms of necessity can be attributed to nature, e.g. non-logical necessity and unnecessary existence. See also de re, de dicto, necessity de re, existence.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
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P. Singer I 4
Nature/Ethics/Mill/P. Singer: as J. St. Mill showed in "On Nature", "nature" means either
a) everything that exists in the universe, including the human beings and their creations, or...
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I 5
b) Nature is what the world is, independent of humans.

In the sense of (a) nothing what humans do can be unnatural, in the sense of (b) one can not conceive the determination that human action is "unnatural" as a reproach because everything is then an interaction with nature and much of it is desirable.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Mill II
J. St. Mill
Utilitarianism: 1st (First) Edition Oxford 1998


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-10-23