Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Hypotheses: Hypotheses are assumptions made before performing experiments to compare the results of these experiments with them. Hypotheses must be fed by a given theory that is at least rudimentary, which determines what belongs to the domain of the objects involved, the concepts used and the possible consequences, and what cannot belong to it. In the course of the theory formation there is a mutual correction of assumptions and test results and the set of concepts and sentences of the theory. See also theories, methods, verification.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 33
Hypotheses/Feyerabend: Hypotheses can be used that contradict well-confirmed theories and/or experimental results. The sciences can be promoted by proceeding contrainductively.
I 120
Ad-Hoc Hypotheses/Feyerabend: initial difficulties caused by the change are mitigated by ad-hoc hypotheses, which therefore sometimes have a positive function. They give new theories a break, and they indicate the direction of future research.
I 121
Lakatos: pro ad-hoc theories.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Fe I
P. Feyerabend
Wider den Methodenzwang Frankfurt 1997

Fe II
P. Feyerabend
Erkenntnis für freie Menschen Frankfurt 1979


> Counter arguments against Feyerabend

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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-24