Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Sense, philosophy: sense is a property of statements which makes the determination of the truth value (true or false) possible, although not guaranteed. Even false statements make sense; otherwise their falsehood could not be established. What is meaningless, therefore, is what cannot be negated. Statements about the future allow an assessment of probabilities if they are sensible without having a truth value. Wishes and commands are sensible and understandable if they can be reformulated into negative statements. See also understanding, negation, truth values, verification, determination, indeterminacy, probability, Fregean sense.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
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Dummett I 185
Descartes/Dummett: Descartes does not speak about grasping of the meaning, but about the recognition and acknowledgment of the truth. He does not ask what statements mean, but conceives their content as something unproblematic. He asks what we may rightly claim to recognize.

This is by no means the approach of Evans and Co. They ask: what does it mean to grasp these concepts?

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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Du I
M. Dummett
Ursprünge der analytischen Philosophie Frankfurt 1992

Du III
M. Dummett
Wahrheit Stuttgart 1982


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> Counter arguments in relation to Sense



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-06-26