Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Rules, philosophy: rules are restrictions of a domain of possibilities for subjects, communities or functionaries, or generally for acting individuals or groups. Rules may be implicit or explicit, and may be implemented by ordinance or by jointly developing equally authorized participants, e.g. in a discourse. In another sense, rules can be understood as actual regularities that can be discovered by observation. These rules can be discovered not only in action, but also in the nature of objects such as linguistic structures. See also norms, values, rule following, private language, language rules, discourse, ethics, morality, cognitivism, intuitionism, society, practice.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon:
David Chalmers
I 329
Rules/Artificial Intelligence/VsAI/VsChalmers/Chalmers: Arguments related to the alleged impossibility of (strong) artificial intelligence point out that artificial systems follow strictly rules and are therefore incapable of creativity and flexibility.
ChalmersVsVs: this only applies to symbol processing and not all systems of artificial intelligence are limited to symbol processing. Connectivist models do not exist in symbol manipulation. It may be that these systems follow rules on a level, but that does not show up in behavior.
Level/Hofstadter/Chalmers: (Hofstadter 1979) the level on which I think is not necessarily the level on which I add.

Cha I
D.Chalmers
The Conscious Mind Oxford New York 1996

Cha II
D. Chalmers
Constructing the World Oxford 2014


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-24