Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Qualia, philosophy: qualia are the sensory-like correspondences to properties perceived on external objects or processes. Problems arise in connection with the explanation of their origin and their comparability between individuals. See also phenomena, sensory perception, sensations, perceptions, stimuli, qualities, subjectivity, intersubjectivity, objectivity, inverted spectra, consciousness.
 
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Rorty VI 405
Historism/Rorty: it is no coincidence that the historicity of philosophy today is questioned above all by the authors, who stress that it is necessary to recognize the "existence of the unspeakable".
E.g. Robert Adams: Thesis: only the existence of God can explain the interrelationship between brain and qualia.
Qualia/Robert Adams: Qualia is not analysable, therefore it is not traceable to elementary particles. Reductionism "can be disproved by seeing red or tasting onions."
RortyVsAdams: this refutation is a typical "invocation to the unspeakable". An invocation to a kind of knowledge that cannot be questioned by any re-description. For here it is not a question of knowledge of descriptions, but of knowledge by direct acquaintance. ((s) Non-transferable)
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VI 406
RortyVsAdams: a lot has to be established already in the language before a plausible invocation to the taste of onions is possible at all.
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Rorty VI 413
Sense qualities/Nagel: sense qualities have invariant conditions. (Also Robert Adams).

Ro I
R. Rorty
Der Spiegel der Natur Frankfurt 1997

Ro II
R. Rorty
Philosophie & die Zukunft Frankfurt 2000

Ro III
R. Rorty
Kontingenz, Ironie und Solidarität Frankfurt 1992

Ro IV
R. Rorty
Eine Kultur ohne Zentrum Stuttgart 1993

Ro V
R. Rorty
Solidarität oder Objektivität? Stuttgart 1998

Ro VI
R. Rorty
Wahrheit und Fortschritt Frankfurt 2000


> Counter arguments against Adams
> Counter arguments in relation to Qualia



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-22