Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Signs: signs are recognizable and definable forms that an observer can assign to two domains. The first domain is the repertoire of available forms that allows a distinction of similarity and dissimilarity within this domain, the second domain is a set of objects which also distinguishes between similarity and dissimilarity between these objects as well as distinguishing the objects of the second domain from the forms of the first domain. There are no signs without observation or interpretation. See also language, words, symbols, icons, systems, image, image theory, pictures, assignment.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
Stegmüller IV 79
Excessive fact/Wittgenstein: (Philosophical Investigations/PI § 192): Kripke: straightforward solution: finding an excessive fact: this should clearly define as a finite fact the potentially infinite future uses of a sign. - That is impossible.
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II 48
Sign/Symbol/Wittgenstein: a sign can be nonsensical. - A symbol cannot be nonsensical. - Also tone and expression are part of the symbol. - Incomplete symbol: E.g. "I'm hungry" written on the blackboard.
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VI 159
Sign/Wittgenstein/Schulte: signs are not interpreted, but known. This is a practical ability. -> Training.
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VI 177
Definition Symptom/Wittgenstein: a phenomenon that occurs according to experience with the phenomenon together, which is our defining criterion. - E.g. Symptoms: sore throat. - Criteria: Angina bacillus. - The fluctuation of grammar between the two makes it seem as if there were only symptoms. - Meaning: is not only secured by shared occurrence (like a symptom). - Instead: we need the method of verification.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

W II
L. Wittgenstein
Vorlesungen 1930-35 Frankfurt 1989

W III
L. Wittgenstein
Das Blaue Buch - Eine Philosophische Betrachtung Frankfurt 1984

W IV
L. Wittgenstein
Tractatus Logico Philosophicus Frankfurt/M 1960

Ca V
W. Stegmüller
Rudolf Carnap und der Wiener Kreis
In
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd I, , München 1987

St I
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd I Stuttgart 1989

St II
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd 2 Stuttgart 1987

St III
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd 3 Stuttgart 1987

St IV
W. Stegmüller
Hauptströmungen der Gegenwartsphilosophie Bd 4 Stuttgart 1989


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-07-25