Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Overdetermination, philosophy: the concept of overdetermination has different meanings. A) The fulfillment of several conditions which are sufficient for the occurrence of an event alone, and whereby no further determination of the actual cause can be given. B) The simultaneous ability to attribute a property and its opposite, as far as this opposite of a property can be formulated. C) If the truth value (truth or falsehood) of a statement is concerned, the attribution of properties to objects which do not change the truth value is an overdetermination. See also indeterminacy, fulfillment, executability, determinism.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 57
INDIVIDUALS/Meixner: individual-like objects: e.g. round the square but also e.g. Holmes, fictional people and their body parts, which cannot be said to have certain properties or not to have them. - The man who knew that he knows nothing: not Socrates, but an INDIVIDUAL. (overdetermined: knowledge / ignorance).
I 56
Def overdetermination: anything is overdetermined if there is at least one property that can be claimed by: x has f and not-f.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Mei I
U. Meixner
Einführung in die Ontologie Darmstadt 2004


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-24