Philosophy Dictionary of Arguments

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Gadamer I 134
Tragedy/Ancient Philosophy/Gadamer: What is reflected in the reflection on the tragic from Aristotle up to the present is certainly not an unchangeable being. That the nature of tragedy is presented in a unique way in the Attic tragedy is no doubt - and different for Aristotle, for whom Euripides was the most "tragic"(1) different for the one, for example, to whom Aeschylus reveals the true depth of the tragic phenomenon - but even more different for the one who thinks of Shakespeare or Hebbel. Such a change, however, does not simply mean that the question of the unified nature of the tragedy becomes irrelevant, but on the contrary, that the phenomenon presents itself in its outline, condensed into a historical unity. >Tragedy/Kierkegaard, >Tragedy/Aristotle.


1. Arist. Poet. 13, 1453 a 29.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.
The note [Author1]Vs[Author2] or [Author]Vs[term] is an addition from the Dictionary of Arguments. If a German edition is specified, the page numbers refer to this edition.
Ancient Philosophy
Gadamer I
Hans-Georg Gadamer
Wahrheit und Methode. Grundzüge einer philosophischen Hermeneutik 7. durchgesehene Auflage Tübingen 1960/2010

Gadamer II
H. G. Gadamer
The Relevance of the Beautiful, London 1986
German Edition:
Die Aktualität des Schönen: Kunst als Spiel, Symbol und Fest Stuttgart 1977


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2020-09-26
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