Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Speech Act Theory: Speech act theories are theories that place the focus of their reflections on what speakers effect with utterances rather than on the representation function of expressions and sentences. Different types of speech acts are distinguished depending on whether they are factual determinations, questions, commands, as well as aspects of these acts that go beyond a situation such as baptism or oath. See also actions, utterances, meanings, speaker meaning, representation.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
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TugendhatVsSpeech Act

I 137
TugendhatVsSpeech Acts: unsatisfactory, assumed modes, because they are just like propositional content abstract moments of sentences that we can hardly believe - because they are moments and not components, they are also not independent.
I 239
Speech Act / Austin /Tugendhat: his merit is to have lifted the illocutionary act (meaning, claiming) as an independent, semantically relevant way.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Tu I
E. Tugendhat
Vorlesungen zur Einführung in die Sprachanalytische Philosophie Frankfurt 1976

Tu II
E. Tugendhat
Philosophische Aufsätze Frankfurt 1992


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-26