Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Sentences: sentences are linguistic forms for expressing existent or non-existent issues of conditions, wishes, questions or commands. Statements can be true or false, unlike other forms of sentences like questions or single words. See also subsentential, truth, statements.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Summary Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 16ff
One proposal boils down to intepret the rest of the sentence, following the "believes" as a complex adverb.
I 22f
DavidsonVs: no one has any idea how it the meanings of each word could be derived. We understand the sentences obviously, because we understand the contained words.
If the "content" of the propositional attitudes were the meanings, novel and long words would have to be learned - words which often occur only once. But since every declarative sentence can occur as a content sentence, their number is infinite and therefore not learnable.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

D I
D. Davidson
Der Mythos des Subjektiven Stuttgart 1993

D III
D. Davidson
Handlung und Ereignis Frankfurt 1990

D IV
D. Davidson
Wahrheit und Interpretation Frankfurt 1990


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-11-20