Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Rules, philosophy: rules are restrictions of a domain of possibilities for subjects, communities or functionaries, or generally for acting individuals or groups. Rules may be implicit or explicit, and may be implemented by ordinance or by jointly developing equally authorized participants, e.g. in a discourse. In another sense, rules can be understood as actual regularities that can be discovered by observation. These rules can be discovered not only in action, but also in the nature of objects such as linguistic structures. See also norms, values, rule following, private language, language rules, discourse, ethics, morality, cognitivism, intuitionism, society, practice.
 
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Brandom: (where?)
Rules / Kant: the form of the normative as such. To call something "necessary" , means that it is done according to a rule. (Applies to nature as for humans).
Terms are rules. For Kant, there is absolutely no non-normative realm.

Strawson V 75
Rules / Kant: for notions to have an objective reference, it is necessary that they mutually have a certain unity or interconnectedness - Kant speaks of such concepts of objects as rules -
V 76
Violations of these rules are illusions or "appearance"
I. Kant
I Günter Schulte Kant Einführung (Campus) Frankfurt 1994
Externe Quellen. ZEIT-Artikel 11/02 (Ludger Heidbrink über Rawls)
Volker Gerhard "Die Frucht der Freiheit" Plädoyer für die Stammzellforschung ZEIT 27.11.03
Str I
P.F. Strawson
Einzelding und logisches Subjekt Stuttgart 1972

Str IV
P.F. Strawson
Analyse und Metaphysik München 1994

Str V
P.F. Strawson
Die Grenzen des Sinns Frankfurt 1981


> Counter arguments against Kant
> Counter arguments in relation to Rules



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-25