Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Reference, philosophy: reference means a) the relation between an expression and one or more objects, thus the reference or b) the object (reference object) itself. Terminological confusion arises easily because the author, to whom this term ultimately goes back - G. Frege - spoke of meaning (in the sense of "pointing at something"). Reference is therefore often referred to as Fregean meaning in contrast to the Fregean sense, which describes what we call meaning today. See also meaning, sense, intension, extension.


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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 442
Reference: two kinds: 1) word world (extralinguistic reference) E.g. "the author of Dreams of a Mind-Seer "who refers to a real person (namely Kant) - 2) word-word (intra-linguistic or anaphoric reference) E.g. "Wittgenstein wanted to .., so he traveled to Jena".
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I 457
Reference/necessity/Brandom: contingent: The expression "Leibniz" refers to Leibniz - Necessary: ​​Leibniz is Leibniz.
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I 458
Co-reference of types: asserted identity between indirect defined denominations.
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I 465
Reference/Expression/Brandom: our approach distinguishes sharply between expressions and their referents - E.g. The expressions "the expression Leibniz" and "The referent of the expression Leibniz" are used quite differently - "refers to" does not lead to a merger with extra-linguistic things.
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I 465
Reference/Brandom: no particular entity.
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I 651
Referring/Reference/Brandom: cannot be understood in terms of showing, rather the showing must be explained in concepts of reference.
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I 652
Anaphora: is necessary to generate the repeatable from the unrepeatable where co-typicity does not even bear a cancelable assumption of co-reference, and therefore not of (co-)recurrence, either.
- - -
I 678
Brandom: e.g. Fred says to Wilma: "The man with the glass of champagne is very angry." This refers to Barney, but he has ginger ale in his glass. Nelson has champagne in the glass. But he is not angry.
Speaker Reference: Barney,
Semantic reference: Nelson.
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I 678
Pronouns/Brandom: allow us to talk without knowing what we are talking about (reference) - e.g. if he did that, then he deserves whatever he has coming for him.
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II 217
Reference/Quine: According to two dogmas, reference is more important than meaning.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Bra I
R. Brandom
Expressive Vernunft Frankfurt 2000

Bra II
R. Brandom
Begründen und Begreifen Frankfurt 2001


> Counter arguments against Brandom
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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-24