Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Reduction, philosophy: reduction is the tracing back of a set of statements to another set of statements by rephrasing and replacing concepts of a subject domain by concepts from another subject domain. There must be conditions for the substitutability of a concept from the first domain by a concept from the second domain. An example of a reduction is the tracing back of mental concepts to physical concepts or to behavior. See also bridge laws, reductionism, translation, identity theory, materialism, physical/psychical, physicalism, eliminationism, functionalism, roles, indeterminacy.
 
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EMD II 94
Reduction/Dummett: If the sentence is reducible (i.e.- it can not be barely true) then there will be a class R of sentences so that an utterance of S can only be true if the sentences of a suitable subclass of R are all true (((s) > logical form). - The detection of the truth conditions is then detecting the manner in which its truth depends on the truth of the phrases in R.

Du I
M. Dummett
Urspr√ľnge der analytischen Philosophie Frankfurt 1992

Du III
M. Dummett
Wahrheit Stuttgart 1982

EMD II
G. Evans/J. McDowell
Truth and Meaning Oxford 1977

Ev I
G. Evans
The Varieties of Reference (Clarendon Paperbacks) Oxford 1989


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-25