Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Predicates, philosophy, logic: predicates are symbols that can stand in logical formulas for properties. In fact, not every predicate stands for a property, since it has contradictory predicates, but no contradictory properties. For example, one can think of a predicate "squaround" for "square and round", that is, two properties that exclude each other. One can then truthfully say "Nothing is squaround". There are therefore more predicates than properties. See also round square, scheme characters, quantification, 2nd level logic, predication, attributes, adjectives.
 
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V 152f
Predicate expressions do not mean properties. - Predicates: must not be indicative - (predicates are not necessarily demonstrative).
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V 152f
Predicate/SearleVsFrege: tries to represent two irreconcilable positions: a) to extend the distinction sense/meaning to predicates - b) to explain the functional difference between indicative and predicative expressions - Searle: Frege must assume that predicates have a meaning, because he needs that for arithmetics: he needs quantification of properties - solution existence/property/Frege's successor: if two people have the same property, then there is something that they have in common - SearleVs: implication is not reference.

S I
J. R. Searle
Die Wiederentdeckung des Geistes Frankfurt 1996

S II
J.R. Searle
Intentionalität Frankfurt 1991

S III
J. R. Searle
Die Konstruktion der gesellschaftlichen Wirklichkeit Hamburg 1997

S IV
J.R. Searle
Ausdruck und Bedeutung Frankfurt 1982

S V
J. R. Searle
Sprechakte Frankfurt 1983


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-29