Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Predicates, philosophy, logic: predicates are symbols that can stand in logical formulas for properties. In fact, not every predicate stands for a property, since it has contradictory predicates, but no contradictory properties. For example, one can think of a predicate "squaround" for "square and round", that is, two properties that exclude each other. One can then truthfully say "Nothing is squaround". There are therefore more predicates than properties. See also round square, scheme characters, quantification, 2nd level logic, predication, attributes, adjectives.
 
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Arthur Danto
I 110
Predicates "good", "yellow": simple, indefinable (> axioms) - Horse: composed, therefore definable.
Strawson: image of a world with two main components: people and things. The corresponding M-predicates and P-predicates. I 260
  M-predicates: e.g. "weighs 150 pounds,"
  P-predicates: e.g. »dreams of glory."
Mere things are writable with M-predicates, however, is not alone describable with P-predicates, though, if there were really disembodied spirits, they could also be described quite well by this. A person, however, is described by both, by M-​​and P-predicates!

Dt VII
A. C. Danto
The Philosophical Disenfranchisement of Art (Columbia Classics in Philosophy) New York 2005


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-24