Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Phenomenology: is the philosophical direction, which goes back to E. Husserl and which assumes that the phenomena of the objects are what is given to us immediately. According to this assumption, these phenomena are the only evident things to us. See also representation, phenomena, perception, certainty, evidence.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
I 82
Experience / Kant / Tugendhat: Kant: The conditions of the possibility of experience are in general the conditions of the possibility of the objects of experience. -> Not objects to be addressed, but the experience -> phenomenology.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Tu I
E. Tugendhat
Vorlesungen zur Einführung in die Sprachanalytische Philosophie Frankfurt 1976

Tu II
E. Tugendhat
Philosophische Aufsätze Frankfurt 1992


> Counter arguments against Tugendhat
> Counter arguments in relation to Phenomenology



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-06-29