Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Paradoxes: are contradictions within formally correct statements or sets of statements that lead to an existence assumption, which initially seemed plausible, to be withdrawn. Paradoxes are not errors, but challenges that may lead to a re-formulation of the prerequisites and assumptions, or to a change in the language, the subject domain, and the logical system. See also Russellian paradox, contradictions, range, consistency.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon:
Bertrand Russell
I X
Truth/term/being /class/paradoxes/Russell/Goedel: these terms are self-contradictory. - Error: to assume that there is a class of objects for each propositional function, which satisfies it - or that an propositional function existed as a separate entity. - Solution/Russell: late: "No-Class-Theory" : only facon de parler - classes do not exist.
I 38
Paradox/senseless/bivalence/Principia Mathematica/ Russell: a class can not be the subject of its self-determining function. - False solution: the corresponding proposition cannot simply be wrong, it must be meaningless. - ((s) Otherwise we simply get the complements of the problematic sets.)

R I
B. Russell/A.N. Whitehead
Principia Mathematica Frankfurt 1986

R II
B. Russell
Das ABC der Relativitätstheorie Frankfurt 1989

R IV
B. Russell
Probleme der Philosophie Frankfurt 1967

R VI
B. Russell
Die Philosophie des logischen Atomismus
In
Eigennamen, U. Wolf (Hg), Frankfurt 1993

R VII
B. Russell
Wahrheit und Falschheit
In
Wahrheitstheorien, G. Skirbekk (Hg), Frankfurt 1996


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-27