Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Paradoxes: are contradictions within formally correct statements or sets of statements that lead to an existence assumption, which initially seemed plausible, to be withdrawn. Paradoxes are not errors, but challenges that may lead to a re-formulation of the prerequisites and assumptions, or to a change in the language, the subject domain, and the logical system. See also Russellian paradox, contradictions, range, consistency.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
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Books on Amazon
I 461
Reference to semantic paradoxes: a naïve substitutional understanding of the quantification of truth claims obliges to interpret the liar paradox. Such paradoxes can also occur with "refers to": e. g.

(ω) the square root of 2, which is obtained by multiplying -1 with the one referred to by the expression token designated "ω".

(Grover: anaphoric foundation corresponds to Kripke: semantic assignment of a value at the minimum fixed point is the most natural model for an intuitive concept of truth).


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Bra I
R. Brandom
Expressive Vernunft Frankfurt 2000

Bra II
R. Brandom
Begründen und Begreifen Frankfurt 2001


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> Counter arguments against Brandom
> Counter arguments in relation to Paradoxes

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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-12-17