Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Ontological Commitment: A theory is bound to the acceptance of objects if it were wrong without the existence of these objects. It may be, however, that parts of the theory do not have to contain the object, then the ontological commitment for the whole theory is omitted. (See H. Lauener Quine, 1982, p. 130).
 
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I 236f
Properties/attributes/existence/"there are"/quantification/2nd order logic/Schiffer: (Quine 1966, p 164 (German)): even in Quine: e.g. "Is valid" is a verb that can be added to the name of a sentence, and an attribute of the named sentence. - Schiffer: no one would say that Quine thus enters into an ontological commitment - solution: it is understood as substitutional quantification.

Schi I
St. Schiffer
Remnants of Meaning Cambridge 1987


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-26