Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Negation, philosophy, logic: negation of a sentence. In logic, this is done by prefixing the negation symbol. Colloquially expressed by the word "not", which can be at different positions in the sentence. If the negation refers only to one sentence part, this must be made clear by the position, e.g. a predicate can be denied without negating the whole sentence. In logic, therefore, inner and outer negation is distinguished by the use of different symbols.
 
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I 275/76
Negation/logic/truth/correctness/correct: if both truth and correctness are playing a role, there is a distinction (see above > Neg) between the
  a) proper, strict negation: turns any true or correct sentence in a false or incorrect - another negation form:
  b) negation: acts so that a true (or correct) sentence is constructed exactly then when his argument does not reach truth.
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I 276
Negation/WrightVsBoghossian: the proposal does indeed assume that ""A" is true" should be complementary to the negation of A in the latter sense.
        A perfectly reasonable counterproposal is, however, that A should be rather complementary to the strict notion of the former negation.
        Then, for the case that A is only correct, the valuation of ""A" is true" is also correct and the application of the truth predicate will be generally conservative.
WrightVsVs: but the (DB) carpet now throws elsewhere wrinkles
  (see Conservativeness).
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I 88
Negation: Definition negation operator "Neg": "Neg A" is true if A is false and false in all other cases (e.g. with a lack of assertibility or Super-assertibility) - incorrect solution: then with low validity of A <> B: negation equivalence "Neg (P) is true" <> Neg ("P" is true)? - WrightVs: that will not work, even with "assertible" instead of "true".

Wri I
Cr. Wright
Wahrheit und Objektivität Frankfurt 2001


> Counter arguments against Wright



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-26