Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Natural Kinds, philosophy: deviating from the biological definition, substances such as gold, water, etc. are referred to as natural kinds in the recent philosophical discussion. This goes back to the way in which these terms were introduced. (See H. Putnam, “The Meaning of 'Meaning”'. In Philosophical Papers, Vol. 2. Mind, Language and Reality, Cambridge.) Starting from a primary showing, the natural kind is defined as "something like this". The decisive point here is that there is no limit to future research. Virtually, any property that is initially attributed can prove to be a false assumption. See also introduction, definitions, terms.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
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I 136
Names for natural kinds: Gold: could turn out to be blue but would still be gold.
(would retain existence)
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I 141
Origin of terms/natural kind: "this thing" - each property can still turn out to be wrong.

K I
S.A. Kripke
Name und Notwendigkeit Frankfurt 1981

K III
S. A. Kripke
Outline of a Theory of Truth (1975)
In
Recent Essays on Truth and the Liar Paradox, R. L. Martin (Hg), Oxford/NY 1984


> Counter arguments against Kripke



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-28