Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
To mean, intending, philosophy: the intention of a speaker to refer to an object, a property of an object or a situation by means of her words, gestures or actions in a manner which is recognizable for others. From what is meant together with the situation, listeners should be able to recognize the meaning of the characters used.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
McGinn I 111
McGinn: Domestication theory of meaning:
of the third person: these theories shy away from consciousness and its contents while they settle the intended meaning in objective facts which concern the speaking subject. After that, causal, teleological or nomological relations to the environment are constitutive for the intended meaning. (Dretske, Millikan, Fodor).


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

F/L
J. Fodor/E. Lepore
Holism Cambridge USA Oxford UK 1992

McG I
C. McGinn
Die Grenzen vernünftigen Fragens Stuttgart 1996

McG II
C. McGinn
Wie kommt der Geist in die Materie? München 2001


> Counter arguments against Fodor

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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-24