Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
To mean, intending, philosophy: the intention of a speaker to refer to an object, a property of an object or a situation by means of her words, gestures or actions in a manner which is recognizable for others. From what is meant together with the situation, listeners should be able to recognize the meaning of the characters used.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon:
Gareth Evans
I 314
Wittgenstein: E.g. someone is in love with one of two identical twins - God, if he could look into his head, could not tell in which of the two, if the person herself does not know in that moment - ((s) because in the mental state and in the twin there would be no additional information) - Evans: the (descriptive) theory of mind can not explain why erroneous descriptions cannot be decisive.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

EMD II
G. Evans/J. McDowell
Truth and Meaning Oxford 1977

Ev I
G. Evans
The Varieties of Reference (Clarendon Paperbacks) Oxford 1989


> Counter arguments against Evans

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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-26