Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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To mean, intending, philosophy: the intention of a speaker to refer to an object, a property of an object or a situation by means of her words, gestures or actions in a manner which is recognizable for others. From what is meant together with the situation, listeners should be able to recognize the meaning of the characters used.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
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Gareth Evans
I 314
Wittgenstein: E.g. someone is in love with one of two identical twins - God, if he could look into his head, could not tell in which of the two, if the person herself does not know in that moment - ((s) because in the mental state and in the twin there would be no additional information) - Evans: the (descriptive) theory of mind can not explain why erroneous descriptions cannot be decisive.

EMD II
G. Evans/J. McDowell
Truth and Meaning Oxford 1977

Ev I
G. Evans
The Varieties of Reference (Clarendon Paperbacks) Oxford 1989


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-30