Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Contingency, philosophy: Contingency is not synonymous with randomness, but expresses that an existing fact could have been different. Its counterpart is necessity. See also coincidence, necessity, necessity de re.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
Stalnaker I 188
Contingent a priori/Kripke/Stalnaker: Evans: e.g. the inventor of the zipper (whoever he/she is) is assumed to be called Julius (by stipulation) - then the statement "Julius invented the zipper" can be known a priori - Reference/Meaning/Important Argument: because the description was rather used to determine the reference than to give the meaning, the fact that Julius invented the zipper is a contingent fact.


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

K I
S.A. Kripke
Name und Notwendigkeit Frankfurt 1981

K III
S. A. Kripke
Outline of a Theory of Truth (1975)
In
Recent Essays on Truth and the Liar Paradox, R. L. Martin (Hg), Oxford/NY 1984

Sta I
R. Stalnaker
Ways a World may be Oxford New York 2003


> Counter arguments against Kripke



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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-06-28