Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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Causality: causality is the relation between two (separate) entities, whereby a state change of the one entity causes the state of the other entity to change. Nowadays it is assumed that an energy transfer is crucial for talking about a causal link.
D. Hume was the first to consistently deny the observability of cause and effect. (David Hume Eine Untersuchung ├╝ber den menschlichen Verstand, Hamburg, 1993, p. 95).
 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon:
Bertrand Russell
McDowell I 96
Causality / natural laws / Russell: proposed to replace the idea of causation by the idea of a law-governed process.

Simons I 345
RussellVsCausality: (1913) instead functional dependency system: due to many factors (reciprocal position, etc.) change of the actual forces can be in constant simultaneous change of several factors - hardly chains of cause and effect.

R I
B. Russell/A.N. Whitehead
Principia Mathematica Frankfurt 1986

R II
B. Russell
Das ABC der Relativit├Ątstheorie Frankfurt 1989

R IV
B. Russell
Probleme der Philosophie Frankfurt 1967

R VI
B. Russell
Die Philosophie des logischen Atomismus
In
Eigennamen, U. Wolf (Hg), Frankfurt 1993

R VII
B. Russell
Wahrheit und Falschheit
In
Wahrheitstheorien, G. Skirbekk (Hg), Frankfurt 1996

MD I
J. McDowell
Geist und Welt Frankfurt 2001

Si I
P. Simons
Parts Oxford New York 1987


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-29