Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

 
Homophony, philosophy: The special meaning of the concept of homophony in the philosophical discussion about the theory of truth by Tarski is that there must be an additional condition that excludes irrelevant cases. The example "snow is white" is true if and only if snow is white, but it is also true if on the right side of equivalence stands "... if grass is green". This is due to the weak norm of equivalence ("if and only if") which merely requires that both sides are true or both sides are false. The condition of the homophony now requires (a) that the sentence of the left-hand side is repeated on the right-hand side, and (b) that the sentences on both sides come from the same language. See also Theory of truth, truth conditions.

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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Excerpt Meta data

 
Books on Amazon
II 126
Inflationism / Field: assumes facts (unlike the Deflationism) - especially facts about the use of language - FieldVs: what facts should that be? - Deflationism: homophony-condition is sufficient to preclude that we do not use a language with deviating reference - no more facts are needed.
II 133
Meaning / synonymy / Deflationism / Field: a fully developed Deflationism should not rely on inter-personal synonymy, let alone inter-personal attributable meanings - ((s) instead homophony and "how-I-understand-it".) II 134 Then the truth conditions are not semantical.
II 359
Homophony / Field: is met if there is a 1: 1 function (unique assignment).


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.

Fie I
H. Field
Realism, Mathematics and Modality Oxford New York 1989

Fie II
H. Field
Truth and the Absence of Fact Oxford New York 2001

Fie III
H. Field
Science without numbers Princeton New Jersey 1980


> Counter arguments against Field

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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-09-24