Philosophy Lexicon of Arguments

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I 235
McGinn: Genes have representation abilities without semantics.
Genes/McGinn: 2nd possibility: that it is less useful for the brain to develop a potential solution to our philosophical problems than it is for the genes (genetic code).
Genetic Code/Genes/McGinn: contain principles encrypted by the genes
Principles that go beyond the reach of human reason and yet answer some of the bewildered questions of reason?
((s) VsMcGinn: from all these arguments that it would be highly useful it does not follow that it is).
Obviously, the genetic code is a rule for the construction of animal bodies including the brain and mind.
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I 228
Genes/McGinn: one of their most amazing features is the ability to store information. Likewise, the ability to copy the entire reproductive process. Errors occur only very rarely.
That means that genes are virtually incapable of learning! Environmental changes lead to virtually no change in the construction rules for the next generation, no matter how disastrous they may be. Only random mutation.
While the reason is a paragon of flexibility, genes are the culmination rigid behavior.
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I 229
McGinn: thesis, it could be that the genes (discussed above) have solved our philosophical problem, at least partially.
Because firstly, they must have already solved the purely physical problems of the construction: i.e. they represent plans for the construction of the body, and secondly what is true of the body, also applies to the mind. As far as a mental feature is biologically sound, genes must contain instructions for building organisms with this feature. (Building consciousness, also the I, freedom of will, intentionality, all kinds of knowledge.).

McG I
C. McGinn
Die Grenzen vern├╝nftigen Fragens Stuttgart 1996

McG II
C. McGinn
Wie kommt der Geist in die Materie? M├╝nchen 2001


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2017-05-30