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Author Item Summary Meta data
Corr I 326
Personality traits/Jeffrey Gray: Gray’s model of personality, Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) describes personality traits as a function of individual differences in the sensitivities of BIS (behavioural inhibition system), BAS (behavioural approach system) and FFFS (fight-flight-freeze system), Gray (1982)(1) originally described two dimensions of personality associated with BIS sensitivity and BAS sensitivity, which he labelled Anxiety and Impulsivity respectively. Gray viewed Anxiety and Impulsivity as 30˚ rotations from Neuroticism and Extraversion, respectively. Gray and McNaughton (2000)(2) noted, however, that questionnaire measures of Anxiety or BIS sensitivity are, in practice, difficult to distinguish from Neuroticism. >Terminology/Gray, >Terminology/Corr.

1. Gray, J. A. 1982. The neuropsychology of anxiety: an enquiry into the functions of the septo-hippocampal system. New York: Oxford University Press
2. Gray, J. A. and McNaughton, N. 2000. The neuropsychology of anxiety: an enquiry into the functions of the septo-hippocampal system, 2nd edn. New York: Oxford University Press

Colin G. DeYoung and Jeremy R. Gray, „ Personality neuroscience: explaining individual differences in affect, behaviour and cognition“, in: Corr, Ph. J. & Matthews, G. (eds.) 2009. The Cambridge handbook of Personality Psychology. New York: Cambridge University Press

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Corr I 351
Personality traits/Gray: RST (>Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory) assumes that personality factors revealed by multivariate statistical analysis (e.g., factor analysis) reflect sources of variation in neuropsychological systems that are stable over time – that is, they are properties of the individual. (…) the ultimate goal of personality research is to identify the relatively stable biological (i.e., genes and neuroendocrine systems) variables that determine the factor structure that is ‘recovered’ from statistical analysis of behaviour (including verbal output and checking boxes on personality questionnaires; Corr 2004(1); Corr and McNaughton 2008;(2) McNaughton and Corr 2004(3)). >Conditioning/Gray.


1. Corr, P. J. 2004. Reinforcement sensitivity theory and personality, Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 28: 317–32
2. Corr, P. J. and McNaughton, N. 2008. Reinforcement sensitivity theory and personality, in P. J. Corr (ed). The reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality, pp. 155–87. Cambridge University Press
3. McNaughton, N. & Corr, P. J. 2008a. The neuropsychology of fear and anxiety: a foundation for reinforcement sensitivity theory, in P. J. Corr (ed). The reinforcement sensitivity theory of personality, pp. 44–94. Cambridge University Press
McNaughton, N. & Corr, P. J. 2008b. Animal cognition and human personality, in P. J. Corr (ed.), The Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of Personality, pp. 95–119. Cambridge University Press


Philip J. Corr, „ The Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of Personality“, in: Corr, Ph. J. & Matthews, G. (eds.) 2009. The Cambridge handbook of Personality Psychology. New York: Cambridge University Press


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.
The note [Author1]Vs[Author2] or [Author]Vs[term] is an addition from the Dictionary of Arguments. If a German edition is specified, the page numbers refer to this edition.
Gray, Jeffrey A.
Corr I
Philip J. Corr
Gerald Matthews
The Cambridge Handbook of Personality Psychology New York 2009


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Ed. Martin Schulz, access date 2019-05-22
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