Psychology Dictionary of Arguments

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Imagination, philosophy: imaginations are mental representations of non-present situations, events, states, sensory perceptions, experiences with certain characteristics, tones, sound sequences, sounds, noises, voices, smells, heat, coldness etc. The imagination of something undefined is not possible. Understanding a sentence can create an idea of the corresponding situation or image. See also representations past, future, mental states.
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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Concept Summary/Quotes Sources

Stephen M. Kosslyn on Imagination - Dictionary of Arguments

I 253
Pylyshyn: Problem: internal knowledge representation. Vs Visual ideas as a qualitatively independent or theoretically adequate form of mental representation.
>Representation
, >Knowledge representation.
Imagination, visual/Kosslyn: Question: do they differ from other conceptions in structure and function?
I 253
Interpretation: we are never aware of having to interpret imaginary images.
There are no incomplete ideas, for example that half a sofa is missing.
But too much storage capacity would be necessary to store all the information from the retina.
I 256
Besides, there would be no practical access if all of them were stored.
So there must be some interpretation.
>Interpretation.
Pictorial ideas are never necessarily true. (In contrast to some propositions).
>Necessity, >Logical truth, >Truth.
Visual imagination/Kosslyn: mere having does not imply that there is a causal role here.
>Causality, >Causal role.
I 260
Thesis: Our perception consists of parts assigned to objects.
KosslynVsPylyshyn: we do have imaginary images. Even if they are not scanned internally.
If the images are saved uninterpreted, you do not need too much time to access them.
I 253
Imagination/visual imagination/image/picture/Kosslyn/Pomerantz: Interpretation: we are never aware of the need to interpret mental images. There are no incomplete ideas about e.g. that the half of a sofa is lacking. There would be no practical access, if all imaginations were saved. So there must be some interpretation.
I 257
Pylyshyn Thesis: there must be a third code between language and visual presentation - problem: that is uneconomical.


Stephen M. Kosslyn/James R. Pomerantz, Imagery, Propositions and the Form of Internal Representations”, Cognitive Psychology 9 (1977), 52-76

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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution. Translations: Dictionary of Arguments
The note [Concept/Author], [Author1]Vs[Author2] or [Author]Vs[term] resp. "problem:"/"solution:", "old:"/"new:" and "thesis:" is an addition from the Dictionary of Arguments. If a German edition is specified, the page numbers refer to this edition.

Kosslyn I
Stephen M. Kosslyn
James R. Pomerantz
"Imagery, Propositions, and the Form of Internal Representations", in: Cognitive Psychology 9 (1977), 52-76
In
Kognitionswissenschaft, Dieter Münch, Frankfurt/M. 1992


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