Psychology Dictionary of Arguments

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Causality: causality is the relation between two (separate) entities, whereby a state change of the one entity causes the state of the other entity to change. Nowadays it is assumed that an energy transfer is crucial for talking about a causal link.
D. Hume was the first to consistently deny the observability of cause and effect. (David Hume Eine Untersuchung über den menschlichen Verstand, Hamburg, 1993, p. 95).


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Annotation: The above characterizations of concepts are neither definitions nor exhausting presentations of problems related to them. Instead, they are intended to give a short introduction to the contributions below. – Lexicon of Arguments.

 
Author Item Summary Meta data
Corr I 446
Causality/Self-Determination Theory/SDT/Deci/Ryan: the theory proposes that when people do activities to get tangible rewards, their behaviour tends to become dependent on the rewards, so they perceive the locus of causality (De Charms 1968(1); Heider 1958(2)) to shift from internal to external, they feel more controlled, their need for autonomy is thus thwarted, and their intrinsic motivation is undermined. The theory states that the controlling aspect of this external event is salient to the people, and that is what initiates the change in perceived locus of causality and decrease in intrinsic motivation. >Motivation/Deci/Ryan, >Regulation/Deci/Ryan, >Self-Determination Theory/Deci/Ryan.



1. De Charms, R. 1968. Personal causation: the internal affective determinants of behaviour. New York: Academic Press
2. Heider, F. 1958. The psychology of interpersonal relations. New York: Wiley



Edward L. Deci and Richard M. Ryan, „Self-determination theory: a consideration of human motivational universals“, in: Corr, Ph. J. & Matthews, G. (eds.) 2009. The Cambridge handbook of Personality Psychology. New York: Cambridge University Press


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Explanation of symbols: Roman numerals indicate the source, arabic numerals indicate the page number. The corresponding books are indicated on the right hand side. ((s)…): Comment by the sender of the contribution.
The note [Author1]Vs[Author2] or [Author]Vs[term] is an addition from the Dictionary of Arguments. If a German edition is specified, the page numbers refer to this edition.
Deci, Edward L.
Corr I
Philip J. Corr
Gerald Matthews
The Cambridge Handbook of Personality Psychology New York 2009


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